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Does it tiein into a vision statement? Taste SMART Development Goal Setting Methods Plus Downloadable 8 Free Aim-Setting Freeware Methods 10 Setting Goals techniques for Function-athome Moms It is best to keep objectives restricted. Today how will this purpose be measured by us? For the aim to be related, it has to be a skilled organization that allows your job, not a corporation that is haphazard to be advanced by you. It’ll increase the odds of you exceeding and meeting those goals by maintaining your golas SMART. Are you going to attend all meetings? Proceed create a list of 3-7 skilled development ambitions that help that statement and write your statement down.

With a lot of, you’ll get distracted, make spelling mistakes, or possibly produce no feeling.

It really is not at all occasion- bound. Set aside a second to investigate this goal such that it applies to your circumstances and edit it. What are some items to find out about aims? Vision claims are not just for companies. Within paid essay service this collection, discover ideas to produce the complete process more easy. Let us rewrite the goal together. Wise ambitions are: Particular,, feasible, relevant that is considerable, and period-specific.

Choose whether to impose a fee for gis to personnel that are new.

By placing advancement goals that are professional and including them in a published self-assessment, you’ve of achieving success, a greater chance. TARGET 3 – I Will Make More Money by December What is incorrect with this particular purpose? Read more

5 Fun Ways to Build Your Child’s Vocabulary During the Holidays

During the holidays, children are off of school, families are spending time together, the weather is changing, and everyone is eating delicious food! Parents can use this time off as the perfect time to do vocabulary building activities.

5 Fun Vocabulary Building Activities:

  1. Make Lists: Creating a list of items can help increase your child’s vocabulary. If you create lists with your child of grocery items, gifts needed, or even locations, it can help to promote language development and thought organization. Children can begin to associate new words (e.g., stuffing, cranberries, gravy) with the holidays and may be more likely to use these words appropriately.
  2. Words in Context: Targeting and explaining new winter words in context can help to improve your child’s vocabulary. Saying things like, “look at the snowman,” “the icicle is hanging from the tree,” or “look at those children sledding,” will reinforce the new words and encourage usage. When children use new words appropriately praise them, and if necessary model a different use.
  3.  Read Aloud: Reading aloud to your child is extremely beneficial for vocabulary building.  When reading stories, emphasizing and reinforcing new words will enhance vocabulary skills, and asking questions while reading encourages understanding (e.g., what did the Polar Bear see?). If age appropriate, ask your child to retell the story (or part of the story). This will allow him or her to use new vocabulary words in context.
  4. Stress: Exaggerating words or concepts can help children identify information that may be new or unknown. By putting stress on new vocabulary words, children will learn appropriate times to use these important new words. When emphasizing, try changing volume (louder/softer) or even try singing to make word learning more fun!
  5. Get Crafty: Making decorations for your house around the holidays can be a great way to target vocabulary. Your children practice new words with a practical application by making turkey decorations, carving pumpkins, coloring a menorah, making ornaments, or even popsicle picture frames. Hanging and displaying your child’s artwork will not only give them a sense of accomplishment, but will also reinforce new vocabulary words!

Happy Holidays!

Click here to view a copy of our Speech and Language Milestones Infographic!

10 Simple Ways to Show Gratitude

It’s been proven that the act of showing gratitude can lead to a happier, more fulfilling life.  The power of showing thanks lies in changing your internal focus from one of negativity (where you focus on the things you DON’T have) to one of positivity (where you focus on the things you DO have).  However, expressing appreciation for the things in your life is often easier said than done, especially on a bad day.  Read on for 10 simple ways to incorporate more gratitude into your day-to-day life.

10 Simple Ways to Be Thankful:

  1. Keep a journal.  At the end of the day, record five things for which you’re grateful in your journal.  Take time to look back periodically at what you’ve written to note the recurring themes. Read more

Thanksgiving Tongue Twisters

Thanksgiving is nearly here! With the hectic holiday schedule, here are some festive tongue twisters to try with your kids!

Thanksgiving Tongue Twisters:

•    Tom Turkey is terribly timid for tomorrow’s get-together!
•    Fall is for football, feasting, family and friends.
•    Hairy Harry hurried home to heap helpings of honey ham on his plate.
•    Chef Shannon said she shouldn’t share the shake.
•    It thrills Thin Theo to think about the Thanksgiving gathering on Thursday!
•    Gobbling Gill grabbed the gravy from Greedy Gus!
•    Peter Pilgrim passed the platter of pumpkin pie.

Can you say them 5x fast?

Check out our Speech and Language Milestone Infographic!

Family-Friendly Children’s Gross Motor Activities for Fall

Late-autumn is upon us, however, the cooler weather doesn’t mean your children are out of fun things to do outdoors. Gross motor skills are important for kids to improve upon, no matter their age or activity level.  These skills require engagement of the child’s big muscle groups to improve balance, coordination, and posture. In pre-school age kids, working on gross motor skills builds body awareness, helps them keep up with peers and perform better in school, and motivates them to engage more with others.   Below are some simple activities you can do with your children this season that will give them the opportunity to build their muscles and confidence-minimal equipment needed.

Dance

By dance, I don’t mean reviving your ball-room dancing days or enrolling the kids in ballet (though both are great routes to take).  What I mean is simple…be silly with your kids. Put on their favorite song and make up the moves as you go. There is a reason songs such as Hokey Pokey stayed so popular with toddlers and teachers for so long: they make it fun for kids to learn how their limbs work and how to engage their trunk. Tapping their feet to the beat works on coordination, shifting their weight works on their balance, and wiggling their hips works on their obliques and other parts of their core muscle groups.  Teach your child to skip around the room and she will learn to synchronize her opposite sides and build on her total body coordination. Learning to dance with a partner and imitating big movements will help your child tune into working with others, following directions, and use your child’s large muscles in a not so tiring way. Read more

Holiday Cooking for Speech and Language Development

Ready or not, the holidays are right around the corner! This means family, fun, vacations, and a lot of free time. And let’s face it; you’ll most likely have a lot of cooking to do. So, why not have your kids help you, while you help them by making cooking into a fun speech and language activity!

Recipes are a great way to target a variety of speech and language goals in a fun, unstructured way. There is a lot of planning and processing needed to execute a perfect recipe and let’s face it, even the adults don’t always get it right – I know I’ve made a mistake or two! (Why is that cup of flour still sitting on the counter when my cookies are already in the oven?)

Here’s a list of speech and language activities you can tackle with some fun, kid-friendly Thanksgiving desserts from food.com:

  • Sequencing: Read through the recipe and have your child identify what step is first or last. You can incorporate concepts such as before, after, and next. For example, “What comes after the eggs?” You can also have your child repeat the directions in order – if it’s not too complicated! Feel free to use a visual with this task, draw a simple pictures (i.e. a mixing bowl, spoon, cookie sheet) to support each step. Read more

Early Warning Signs for Communication Disorders

Do any of these lines sound familiar when discussing your toddler’s communication?

“He’s not talking much yet, but when is he supposed to?”

“I’m not sure he understands everything I say….”

“He kind of has his own language. I mean I can understand him, but others have a hard time, is that typical?”

As a Pediatric Speech-Language Pathologist, these are some of the most common concerns and questions I hear from new families. Language acquisition and development is a complicated process, for both you and your child. How are you to know what’s typical and what’s not? When are those first words supposed to come? When is he supposed to follow directions? Read more

Tips for Teachers: Developing a Positive Teacher-Student Relationship

The teacher-student relationship is one of great importance, but all too often today with increasing class sizes, over-extended roles required by teachers, and an ever-growing focus on assessment-driven learning, this can sometimes be overlooked.

However, the fact remains that a high-quality teacher with whom students share a positive relationship cannot be overstated.  I remember those teachers in my life who really took a genuine interest in my learning, development, and experience in school.  Unfortunately, I also recall those who tended toward curt remarks and unapproachable attitudes.  Nonetheless, it was those caring teachers who made school and learning enjoyable, attainable, and worthwhile. Read more

3 Strategies to Communicate with Your Kids without YELLING!

Why do your kids continue to do the things that you repeatedly ask them not to do? When will they follow directions? WHY CAN’T YOU GET THROUGH THEM? Do you find yourself asking these questions over and over again without any resolve and feel that the tools you employ to avoid the yelling are hopeless?

When yelling (despite the validity of your message), your meaning gets lost in translation and the stressful delivery is what is heard and reacted to. Use these tips to avoid getting to the point of desperation, where yelling is the knee-jerk response.

3 Ways to Avoid Yelling at Your Kids:

1.    Check in with your own feelings regarding the directive or statement. If you are stressed out, anxious, or upset, it is imperative to work on recognizing these emotions prior to engaging with others so that you will be less emotionally reactive to whatever the outcome. For example, if you have had a long day at work and are running late for a doctor’s appointment AND your child ignores your request to get in the car or complete a time-pressured task, recognize this as being a recipe for an outburst.  Your emotional state plus denied compliance= a huge upset reaction (aka yelling). Read more

Steps to Prevent Injury in Youth Sports

Winter is upon us and with it comes a new sports season. As your children prepare for the start of a new season, help ensure  them a season without injury. According to Campbell 2006, “Children need proper physiologic conditioning, strength and flexibility to participate safely in an organized or recreational athletic endeavor” (p 519)[1]. So what does this mean for your children when they’re playing sports?  Read on for tips to keep them injury free.

Tips to Prevent Injury during Kid’s Sports:

  • Proper Warm-Up: Ensure that your child warms up their muscles with a light jog prior to stretching. This ensures that they can get a good stretch, preventing  muscle strains and pulls. Read more