Entries by Jaclyn Schneider

5 Benefits of In-Clinic and In-School Therapy

The new school year is underway, and children are adjusting to new routines, parents are meeting new teachers, and backpacks are filling with homework. Children are also starting in-school therapies again, often as stipulated through either an individualized education plan (IEP) or a 504 plan. Some children took the summer off from therapy, and others […]

What Happens When Dyslexia Goes Untreated

Language-based learning difficulties can affect up to 20% of the population, with dyslexia being the most common type. People with dyslexia often have difficulty translating ideas into written language and likely have trouble decoding (understanding) written language. Research has shown that most children who struggle with reading in 3rd grade remain poor readers even in high […]

Phonemic Awareness Skills

Phonemic awareness is a building block for literacy. Phonemic awareness, or a child’s ability to manipulate sounds to change word meaning, make new words, or even segment and then blend sounds together to make words, are all important skills when children are learning to read. Parents can practice the skills below with their children, adding […]

Tips to Get Your Toddler Talking

Babies and toddlers go through extremely rapid language development in their first two years. Children explore and learn all the silly sounds they can make (vocal play) and begin to grasp that sounds can have meaning. Children quickly understand how to make their wants and needs known, but there are several tips that parents can […]

Squeeze! You’re Under Arrest: Potential Pitfalls of Squeezable Food Pouches

At a time when fast, convenient, and easy rule the world, it follows that parents would want to minimize hassle and make meal times as efficient as possible. This attitude has brought about foods such as Go-Gurt and GoGo SqueeZ, pouches of yogurt or pureed foods on-the-go, for home and away. These foods allow children […]

Why Is Pronouncing /r/ So Hard?

Because of the difficulty of producing them correctly and on command, /r/ sounds tend to develop relatively late in a child’s speech development. These sounds are typically misarticulated throughout childhood, with mastery emerging close to seven years of age. Misarticulations can vary widely, but the most common /r/ errors involve /w/ substitutions (e.g., “wabbit” for […]