3 At home Exercises For Torticollis | Pediatric Therapy Tv

Here our Pediatric Physical Therapist gives viewers 3 examples of exercises that parents can perform at home with their child who has torticollis.  For more blogs by experts on Torticollis, click here

In This Video You Will Learn:

  • 3 great exercises a parent can do at home with their child who has Torticollis
  • A great alternative to Tummy Time
  • How to get your child to actively move around
  • How to perform an easy pull to sit exercise and why that helps

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide
audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and
innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now, your host, here’s
Robyn.

Robyn: Hello and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I am your host,
Robyn Ackerman, and today I am sitting here with Jesse Coffelt,
who is a pediatric physical therapist. Jesse, can you please let
us know three exercises that we can do with a baby who has been
diagnosed with torticollis?

Jesse: Absolutely. There are three great exercises, and obviously
tummy time is going to be hugely important for these kiddos.
This is a great carry I like to do with babies, where my hand is
supporting the baby’s chest here. It can be comfortable. You can
carry the child here. You can put your hand on her, and she’s
always got to lift up her head to be looking around. So she’s
getting that tummy time equivalent.

Another one that’s really good is you can hold the baby up like
this. Again, you can be engaging with your child, and you can
kind of just be tipping her side to side, looking at her, really
getting her to actively move around.

The third one, if I could just place the doll right here, it’s
like a pull-to-sit exercise. What you’re doing is you’re going
to grasp the child by her hands and just gently and slowly lift
her up. What you’re looking for is making sure that she is
lifting her neck up and she’s actively engaging her abdominals.
You can come up here to sitting, and then slowly take her back
down to laying on the ground. The slower you move, the more
she’s got to actively work and strengthen those muscles.

Robyn: All right, great. Thank you so much, Jesse, and thank you to
our viewers. And remember, keep on blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of
mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To
subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit
our website at LearnMore.me. That’s LearnMore.me.

Robyn

Robyn Ackerman, B.A. in Applied Behavioral Sciences has been in the education field for over 12 years. Her teaching experience includes: Special Education, Acting and Behavior Therapy. Robyn loves working in Social Media, online marketing and website development. Her biggest passions are spending valuable time with her growing family which includes her husband, two daughters and son.

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