Posts

Blog-Parent-vs-Technology-FeaturedImage

Parenting vs. Technology: Helpful Strategies to Combat Electronic Overload

Chromebooks, iPads, Nooks, oh my! It would not be surprising if your child has access to more than one piece of technology in your home. With that said, the struggle to balance technology needs for school with the games and activities that take over your child’s night and weekends is real. BlogParents-vs-Technology-Main-Landscape

Although it may be frustrating to accept that technology is not going away, it’s important to recognize these moments as learning opportunities and a way to become a more creative parent.

Below are some helpful strategies to implement when combating technology:

Reward Responsibility – Create a system in which your child can earn ‘technology minutes’ for completing chores. Similarly to earning an allowance, this can be a great way to get your child more active in helping around the house.

Limit Bingeing Behaviors – Allowing your child to play on technology for multiple hours at a time on the weekend will likely make shorter episodes more difficult to transition out of. When your child has more time available, limit play to 30 minute or 1 hour increments, with other family activities in between.

Practice Transitions – Turning off the iPad, Xbox, or computer is a great opportunity to practice transitions. Provide your child with time warnings, clarify expectations, and work with your child to plan for the next opportunity to use electronics. Remotely turning off the family Wi-Fi can also be a helpful way for children to recognize that their time is up.

Become a Minecraft (or fill in the blank of which game your kiddo likes) expert! – Many of the games and activities your child plays can be a great way for you to spend quality time with your child in “their world.” Ask questions about the games. Read up on the latest news. Show interest and join in!

NSPT offers services in Bucktown, Evanston, Lincolnwood, Glenview, Lake Bluff, Des Plaines, Hinsdale and Milwaukee! If you have questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140.

Social Work

Rachel Ostrov

Rachel Ostrov

Rachel Ostrov is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW) with experience working with children, adolescents, young adults, and their families. She earned her Bachelor of Arts degree from Northwestern University in Psychology and her Master of Arts degree from the University of Chicago in Social Work. Rachel has had the opportunity to practice in a variety of mental health settings including at North Shore University Health System, Youth Services of Glenview, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, and Knapp Therapeutic Day School. She has treated children and adolescents experiencing a wide range of challenges including anxiety, depression, social skill difficulties, and environmental stressors.

More Posts - Website

blog-bullying-warning-signs-featuredimage

Bullying Warning Signs

Bullying is an ongoing concern for parents, care givers and teachers. How to tell if your child is being bullied can be difficult, as bullying can take on many forms. The act is a deliberate imbalanceblog-bullying-warning-signs-main-landscape of power; and can be physical, emotional, sexual or verbal.

Having a working knowledge of warning signs is essential for supportive parenting. If your child has some of the warning signs below, it is not a guarantee that they are being bullied. Open and honest dialogue with your children will provide more insight into the potential causes of some warning signs.

Below are a variety of warning signs that could signify your child is the victim of bullying:

  • Noticing your child has damaged belongings; this can span from clothing, to book bags, to text books, etc.
  • Unexplained physical injuries like bruises or cuts
  • Tendency to isolate from friends and peers
  • An increase in anxiety or fear related to attending school and often will explore opportunities to miss school (i.e. Excuses, faking sick, etc.)
  • Changes in sleeping or eating patterns; suffers from frequent nightmares, poor appetite
  • Appears sad, upset or angry when returning from school
  • Decrease in academic achievement
  • Health concerns; most often frequent stomach aches, headaches, etc.

Beginning a discussion with our children about bullying can be challenging, as many kids tend to shy away from disclosing this information. The most essential component is that as a parent you remain calm and supportive, not reactive to what your child discloses.

There are several questions below to guide a conversation related to bullying:

  • There has been a lot of bullying in the news lately. How does your school handle bullying? Tell me about a time you saw someone being bullied, or experienced it yourself. How did you handle it?
  • I’m worried about [insert behavior/symptom/action]. I’m wondering if you could tell me more about what is going on?
  • Tell me about your friends this year. Who are you spending time with, and what do you like about them?
  • Who do you spend time with at lunch and recess? Tell me about your bus rides home. With whom do you sit?
  • Are there any kids at school who you really don’t like? Why don’t you like them? Do they ever pick on you or leave you out of things?

If your child discloses that they are being bullied, it is essential that you remain calm. Overreaction can result in regret of disclosure or a tendency to limit discussing such content in the future. As a parent, the strongest role you can take if your child is being bullied is to provide support and care, validate to your child that this is not their fault and that you are here to love and support them.

At times, children can be very hesitant about disclosing bullying due to fear of retaliation. If you notice concerning symptoms, but your child denies, it is appropriate to reach out to your student’s teacher and express concern.

The following questions may provide greater insight into your child’s experience during the school day:

  • With whom does my child interact on a daily basis?
  • Tell me about my child’s peer interactions. Which are going well? Are there any you find concerning?
  • Have you noticed any behavioral changes within my child over the past [days, weeks, months]?
  • What is one thing my child does very well in school, and what is one concern you have for my child.

If you suspect your child is being bullied, beginning dialogue and providing a safe non-judgmental space is the first step in supporting your child. If you have greater concerns, or have information that your child is being bullied, it is important that this be addressed as soon as possible. Reach out to your school, principals, teachers, and notify them of your concerns. Provide your child with support and listen when needed, and if appropriate, provide the access to a licensed mental health provider for additional care.

References:

https://www.stopbullying.gov/at-risk/warning-signs/

http://www.violencepreventionworks.org/public/bullying_warning_signs.page

NSPT offers services in Bucktown, Evanston, Highland Park, Lincolnwood, Glenview, Lake Bluff, Des Plaines, Hinsdale and Milwaukee! If you have questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140 and speak to one of our Family Child Advocates!

Social Work

Colleen Manuel

Colleen Manuel

Colleen graduated with both a Master of Social Work from Loyola University Chicago, as well as a Master of Arts in Addiction Therapy from the Hazelden Graduate School for Addiction Studies. Colleen has studied Attachment and Object Relations Theory, Motivational Interviewing, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, and Solution Focused Therapy. Prior to joining North Shore Pediatric Therapy, Colleen provided trauma informed and attachment therapy to adolescents at risk for gang affiliation on Chicago’s West Side; as well as provide mental health and substance abuse treatment specific to members of the LGBT population. Colleen is passionate about providing culturally sensitive and empathic treatment to any client she serves. With specialties in trauma, attachment, children, adolescents, and addiction; Colleen remains dedicated to serving families and children and underserved populations.

More Posts - Website

blog-special-needs-featuredimage

Teaching Kids to Accept and Respect Children with Special Needs

It often takes a tragedy to open up our eyes to see that people struggle every day and it often goes unnoticed until it is too late. That is what happened to a young 10 year old boy with autism who suffered burns on his body, because he was different. That young boy was targeted by the same people who he thought were his friends, because he was raised not to judge people based on their differences. The skill of empathy and understanding of other’s differences is a learned skill and it is up to the parents to teach it.blog-special-needs-main-landscape

Disabilities cover a wide range and come in all different shapes and sizes. With schools and other childhood social activities pushing towards the inclusive modality, your child will at some point encounter a child with disabilities.  Just as you guided your very young child when he or she began to befriend others, you can encourage your child to learn about and be a friend to children who have disabilities.

Parents who model and teach the following skills to their children can go a long way in teaching their children to be empathetic of others.

5 Ways To Teach Children How To Accept Kids With Special Needs:

  • The understanding that no two people are the same and that is a good thing. Accepting the uniqueness of the individual and also celebrating the differences can open your child up to a world of happiness.
  • Teaching your child that a disability is not who the person is and there are many cool and fun attributes that they have. All kids have to do is find them through play and friendship.
  • Children with disabilities are like all children in that they want friends, respect and to be included.
  • Do not be afraid of children with disabilities. They make look different, but once you get to know them, they are the same child looking for fun and joy.
  • Read books or watch YouTube videos about children with special needs and discuss them after with your children. Having an open dialogue with your children will make all the difference.

Don’t be afraid to talk to your children about difficult topics. Children need the love and support that their parents can give them and at the same time need parents to be there for them. Let’s be proactive in handling these conversations before we need to have a harder one about the next tragedy.

Resources:

https://www.care.com/c/stories/6618/teaching-your-child-about-peers-with-special/

NSPT offers services in Bucktown, Evanston, Highland Park, Lincolnwood, Glenview, Lake Bluff, Des Plaines, Hinsdale and Milwaukee! If you have questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140 and speak to one of our Family Child Advocates!

Social Work

Brett Siegel

Brett Siegel

Brett Siegel received his Bachelor and Masters degrees in Social Work at The University of Kansas and Loyola University Chicago respectively. While completing his Master's degree, Brett's field practicum took place at Rainbow Hospice, providing therapy for children working through the grief process followed by an internship year at Lutheran General Hospital providing diagnosis and psychotherapy on the mental health adolescent unit. While attaining his LCSW certification, Brett moved to Bloomington, Illinois where he served as a crisis therapist for children and their families. Brett joins North Shore Pediatric Therapy with a plethora of experiences that have served to foster professional growth and development. He has worked extensively in the areas of case management and clinical/therapeutic interventions with children, adults, families and groups. His professional interests include, but are not limited to pediatric and adolescent mental health, the bullying epidemic and the impact of divorce on children and their families.

More Posts - Website

Blog-ADHD-FeaturedImage

4 Practices Parents Can Do at Home That Will Help Children with ADHD at School

This guest blog was written by retired teacher, Joyce Wilson.Blog-ADHD-Main-Landscape

It’s common for parents of children with ADHD to be concerned for their children’s behavior at school.
But there’s no need to feel powerless. Implementing a few best practices at home will create a ripple effect and help improve your child’s behavior in the classroom, too.

  1. Encourage Physical Activity

Regular exercise has many benefits for children with ADHD, most having to do with increased brain function. Play games and sports with your child or simply go for a walk outside. The fresh air and bodily movement will help calm his restlessness and sharpen his focus.

It’s wise to let your child’s teacher know that taking away his recess time as a punishment is the exact opposite of what she should do if she wants to see an improvement in his behavior. Let her know how important this active time is for his mental focus.

  1. Encourage Organization

Teach organization and tidiness at home so your child can take these habits to school with her.

Teach her the importance of having a tidy room and work space and help her organize her school supplies. Use dividers, Post-it notes, folders, and color coordination to break her schoolwork down into a manageable, organized chunks.

  1. Create Structure

Your child will benefit from routine in the form of a daily schedule that runs morning to night. Keep schedules and to-do lists posted where your child can see them and include checkboxes next to each task on a list.

Sticking to a schedule helps children with ADHD persist with tasks that they might not necessarily feel like doing at the moment. Insisting they stick to a routine will help performing these tasks become habits for them. For instance, although it’s often difficult for children with ADHD to fall asleep, they still need to stick to a regular sleep schedule the best they can.

  1. Make Your Expectations Clear

When your child is organized, sticking to his schedule, and participating in physical activity like you’ve asked him to, make sure you’re rewarding him for his efforts and thanking him for his cooperation.

Positive reinforcement through small rewards is just one aspect of managing your child’s behavior. Set rules and make it clear to your child that you expect him to follow them at home and at school. Be specific when disciplining your child and let him know exactly how you’d like him to improve his behavior.

Be specific with your praise as well so he can continue to make you proud by doing exactly what you’ve asked him to. Giving him the praise he deserves will encourage him to continue to succeed in life at home and life in the classroom.

NSPT offers services in Bucktown, Evanston, Highland Park, Lincolnwood, Glenview, Lake Bluff, Des Plaines, Hinsdale and Milwaukee. If you have questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140 and speak to one of our Family Child Advocates!

Find-Out-More-About-ADHD
Joyce Wilson is a retired teacher with decades of experience. Today, she is a proud grandmom and mentor to teachers in her local public school system. She and a fellow retired teacher created TeacherSpark.org to share creative ideas and practical resources for the classroom.

North Shore Pediatric Therapy

North Shore Pediatric Therapy

North Shore Pediatric Therapy is a group of experienced and dedicated Thought Leaders in pediatric therapy. We believe passionately in helping each child blossom to their ultimate potential.

More Posts - Website

What is Prader-Willi Syndrome

Prader-Willi Syndrome is a congenital disorder that is caused by a missing gene on part of chromosome 15. These children are found to prader willi syndrome have cognitive skills in the below average to mild mental retardation range.

Physical symptoms associated with Prader-Willi include:

  • Newborns often present with low tone
  • Almond shaped eyes
  • Delayed motor development
  • Short stature
  • Very small hands and feet

The main symptom associated with Prader-Willi is a very strong interest in food with a lack of sensitivity to the physiological sensation of satiation. This means that the child will continue to eat with no sense of feeling full. Research has found that these children are at a very high risk to develop obesity and diabetes.

The main intervention that should be offered to these children is that the child works with a behaviorally trained therapist (psychologist or social worker) and a dietitian in order to develop healthier eating habits as well as behavioral incentives to decrease eating.

Click here to meet with a neuropsychologist for solution based therapy!

Dr. Greg Stasi

Gregory Stasi, Ph.D., is a licensed Clinical Psychologist who graduated from Purdue University with a Bachelor Degree in Psychology. He went on to earn his Masters and Doctorate at the Illinois Institute of Technology where he made his decision to focus his career on pediatric neuropsychology. Dr. Stasi has worked and studied at numerous medical centers including: The University of Chicago Medical Center and the University of Minnesota Medical Center. Prior to working at North Shore Pediatric Therapy, Dr. Stasi was a faculty member at Rush Presbyterian St. Luke’s Hospital and was a neuropsychologist at the Rush Neurobehavioral Center. Dr. Stasi has extensive experience with the assessment and diagnosis of a variety of conditions including: learning disorder, ADHD, Autism Spectrum Disorders, and social/emotional concerns. Dr. Stasi also serves as a school advocate for parents by providing assistance and case management in order for children with special needs to obtain the most effective school accommodations possible.

More Posts - Website

The Importance of One-On-One Time with Your Child

One-on-one time you spend with your child is priceless. It says to your child, “You are special.” It symbolizes your unconditional love mother and son togetherfor your child. There is nothing that can replace your undivided attention. Special time works best when several guidelines are followed.

Guidelines for One-On-One Time with Your Child:

  • Call the reserved time a certain name that the child understands, such as “special time.”
  • Set aside this time every day regardless of your child’s behavior that day.
  • Never take this time away as a punishment.
  • Give one-on-one time separately. One day mom and son can have their time together. The next day dad and son can have their time. Make this time for each child in the family.
  • Use this opportunity to do a fun, interactive activity. Do not use the time for watching TV or other passive activities.
  • Don’t interrupt this time by taking phone calls or attending to other distractions that take your attention away from the special time.
  • Be consistent with one-on-one time. Stick to the scheduled time and end when the time is finished.

If your child refuses to engage in “special time”, continue to pursue. You are conveying to your child that you are sincerely interested in him/her and want to have this time together.

Howard, BJ. 2002. Guidelines for special time. In Jellinek M, Patel BP, Froehle MCV, eds., Bright Futures in Practice: Mental Health-Volume II. Tool Kit. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health.

Amy Winer

Amy Winer is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW). She received her bachelor’s degree from Michigan State University and earned a Masters Degree in Social Work from the University of Denver. She has extensive experience working with children, adolescents and families. While living in Colorado, her practice was focused on working with children in the school setting. As a school social worker, Amy engaged with both the general education population and the special needs students. She guided families through the IEP process and facilitated various plans (504 plans) to help children and adolescents reach greater success in the school environment. Through the development of a trusting relationship, she worked effectively with both individuals and groups related to their various needs. Additionally, she had the opportunity to provide social work services to the more severely emotionally challenged children in a day treatment facility.

More Posts - Website

Speech and Language for the Adopted Child

The number of foreign adoptions in the US continues to grow every year. Children who are adopted may be at greater risk for speech and/or language difficulties. Occasionally, this is secondary to a congenital disorder and, at times, the difficulties are secondary to the abrupt change in the child’s primary language. It is important to be aware and know what to expect with an adopted child.  

When Should An Adopted Child Start Speaking? adoption and speech

Speech/language should be closely monitored for the first 12 months. This is approximately enough time for a child to “catch-up” with their native speaking peers if adopted before age 2-2 ½. Adopted children that are older than 2 ½ will often catch up quickly as well; however, it may take a longer period of time to acquire the language.

How “Age” At Adoption Makes An Impact On Speech:

The orphanage conditions have an impact on the exposure and quality of language and interaction that your child received during these very important years, therefore, the longer the child was exposed, the longer amount of time the child may require to readjust. Unfortunately, some research by Gunnar & Quevedo (2007 ) indicates that prolonged exposure in these orphanages may have permanent effects on stress that can impact the memory storage and retrieval areas of the brain associated with language. The younger the child is when adopted, the better outcomes predicted.

Children adopted during the preschool years have minds that are uniquely prepared  to absorb language, regardless of their birth language. In other Read more

Kate Connolly

Kate Connolly graduated with an M.S. degree from Rush University. Her personal area of interest is the craniofacial anomalies population and early pediatric feeding. Over her time at Rush University Medical center, she completed internships with Rush University Medical Center Craniofacial Center, University of Illinois at Chicago Child and Family Development Center, Rush University Medical Center Speech and Hearing Clinic, Black Bear Therapeutic Preschool and several others. Kate enjoys volunteering for the Muscular Dystrophy Association, Taylor Bug Kisses Foundation and Association of Horizon, all of which have strengthened her love of working with the pediatric population.

More Posts - Website

Healthy Twists on Your Kids Favorite Foods

Let’s face it; kids have their favorite foods and those foods may not be the healthiest choices. Wouldn’t it be nice if we, as parents, could make healthier mango icecreamversions of foods that kids actually enjoyed? Well, you can! These recipes have been kid-tested and approved in my office (and home).

Below are a few ideas on healthy twists on your kid’s favorite foods:

Rice Cake Pizzas:

  • Brown rice cakes
  • Fat-free pizza sauce
  • Mozzarella cheese
  • Baby spinach, sliced tomatoes and/or diced green peppers

Take out one rice cake and place 1-2 tablespoons of pizza sauce on top. Sprinkle about ¼ cup of cheese and as many veggies as you can get on top. Heat in the microwave for about 20 seconds or until cheese is melted. One “pizza” is approximately 100 calories, which makes a great snack or part of a meal. These pizzas are also gluten-free.

Simple Homemade Mango “Ice Cream”:

  • 2 cups nonfat vanilla Greek Yogurt
  • 1 package (16 oz) of frozen mangoes

Let mangoes sit at room temperature for about 10 minutes to thaw slightly. Place all ingredients into a blender or food processor. Blend until smooth so that the consistency is similar to ice cream, or for about 5 minutes. Serving size is ½ cup, which is 100 calories. This is a great option for a healthy dessert. Mangoes are high in vitamin A and the yogurt is a great source of protein and calcium.

Kale Chips:

  • 4 large kale leaves, washed and stems removed
  • 1 tablspoon olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt

Preheat oven to 350. After washing kale and removing stems, tear kale into bite-size pieces (approximately 2 inches x 2 inches each). Put kale pieces into a large bowl with olive oil and salt. Toss to coat. Spread out on a rectangular cookie sheet and bake for about 10 minutes or until kale is crispy like chips. Recipe makes 3-4 servings;however, this snack is so healthy that there is really no limit to the serving! Kale is a superfood and is high in many vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients.

These recipes are all winners- for parents as well as kids. They are low in calories but high in nutrients, which is the best combination. What are some of your kid-approved healthy twists on recipes?  I would love to hear about your recipes in the comments section below!

Stephanie Wells

Stephanie Wells, is a Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist. Stephanie comes from Mary Bridge Children’s Hospital in Tacoma Washington, where she worked with babies and children with many nutritional and diet needs. Stephanie is excited to bring her experience and expertise to North Shore Pediatric Therapy, and is looking forward to helping as many kids as she can.

More Posts - Website

7 Developmental Steps To Teaching Your Child To Catch

Children learn at a very early age how to roll a ball.  As they grow into toddlers, they can begin to understand the basics of playing girl playing catchcatch.  As with any other skill, catching a ball is something that takes practice. Below is the developmental sequence for teaching your kiddo how to catch.

7 Developmental Steps To Teaching Your Child To Catch:

  1. Push a ball across the floor.  Encourage your child to receive the ball between their outstretched legs and then push it back to you. This teaches your child the concept of reciprocal play as well as turn-taking. It also teaches them about the concept of cause and effect (push ball and the ball will roll).
  2. Catch a ball with both hands. Use an underhand toss to throw a large playground-sized ball to your child’s chest. When first learning to catch, encourage your child to catch the ball by wrapping their arms around the ball and cradling it to their chest. When their accuracy to catch the ball against their chest improves, encourage them to use only the palms of their hands and fingers.
  3. Catching a ball with one hand. Ask your child to put one hand behind their back or in their pocket. Again, toss a tennis ball to your child’s chest. Encourage them to catch the ball using only the hand that is free. Another technique that you can use is to put a baseball mitt on your child’s non-dominant hand. Encourage them to catch the ball in the mitt, transfer it to their other hand and toss it back to you.
  4. Dropping and catching a ball with two hands. The next step is to drop a tennis ball and catch it using both hands. The biggest trick for catching the ball after bouncing it on the floor is to start the drop at waist height, as opposed to at the level of their chest or higher. This will provide a smaller and more manageable bounce.
  5. Dropping and catching a ball two hands. Once your child can drop and catch a tennis ball with two hands, challenge them to do the same action with one hand.
  6. Bounce and catch with partner. Once your child can drop and catch a tennis ball by themselves, try to stand about 10 feet away from them and play catch by bouncing the ball back and forth with your child. Start by throwing it to the mid-line of their body. Once they’re able to consistently catch the ball, you should throw the ball to their sides.
  7. Over/Under: The next step in the ball-catching process is the trickiest game of catch yet. It requires two balls. Designate one partner as the “over” and one as the “under.” The person who throws over will throw their ball  in the air to their partner. The one who throws under will bounce the ball on the floor to their partner. Count to three before each bounce and see how many times you can simultaneously pass between each other without dropping either ball!

Depending on your child’s skill level, there are ways in which you can alter the game in order to make it easier or more challenging for your child. For example, you could use a larger or smaller ball. Smaller balls are more difficult to catch. In addition, you could increase or decrease the distance between you and your child. The closer you stand to them, the easier the task will be. You could also give your child a carpet remnant or draw a shape on the floor. Direct your child to stand on that designated spot while playing catch. This will help them define their space so that they only need to worry about catching and throwing, rather than their body positioning.

Practicing catch also works on a variety of skills that will transfer to other functional activities. These skills include bilateral coordination, convergence of eyes, projected action skills and visual motor skills.

You’ve got the steps. Now, get out there and play ball!

Lindsey Moyer

Lindsey Moyer

Lindsey Moyer, is a licensed pediatric occupational therapist. She graduated from Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, Michigan with a Bachelors Degree in Health and Human Services. A year later, she graduated with her Masters of Science in Occupational Therapy. While a student, Lindsey gained expansive knowledge of the field by working in a variety of settings with people of varying ages and disabilities. Lindsey’s interest and compassion for working with children and their families became apparent as she completed internships and independent studies focusing on educational, social, and physical development. One such internship was completed at North Shore Pediatric Therapy (NSPT). Lindsey loves supporting kids in the acquisition of skills needed to lead fun and enriching childhoods.

More Posts - Website

Fragile X Syndrome

Fragile X Syndrome is one of the most common forms of inherited intellectual disability in children.  This condition arises by a mutation in a single gene on the X chromosome.  Both males and females can have Fragile X; however, as males have only one X chromosome, they are usually affected more severely and show poorer functioning.

Physical Features Associated with Children who have Fragile X:fragile x syndrome

  • Long faces and prominent ears
  • Flat feet
  • Flexible joints and low muscle tone
  • Large body size
  • Soft skin

Cognitive Features Associated with Children who have Fragile X:

  • Median IQ in moderate impaired range for males
  • Median IQ in low average range for females
  • Articulation and speech difficulties
  • Pragmatic (Social) language difficulties
    • Understanding idioms and non-literal languag
    • Inferring meaning from contex
    • Echolalia (repeating what others state)
  • Poor motor movements
  • Difficulties with visual spatial functioning
  • Poor mathematics and abstract reasoning
  • Difficulties with executive functioning
  • Difficulties with socialization

Research has demonstrated that children with Fragile X Syndrome often benefit from a multi-faceted treatment approach which might include:

  • Sign language if there are significant deficits with language functioning
  • Minimization of visual and auditory distractions in the classroom
  • Academic intervention focused on an individual level versus a group level
  • Stimulant medication for difficulties with attention
  • Speech/language therapy for language development
  • Occupational Therapy for motor and visual spatial development.

To find out more how your child may benefit from treatment, click here to contact us.

Dr. Greg Stasi

Gregory Stasi, Ph.D., is a licensed Clinical Psychologist who graduated from Purdue University with a Bachelor Degree in Psychology. He went on to earn his Masters and Doctorate at the Illinois Institute of Technology where he made his decision to focus his career on pediatric neuropsychology. Dr. Stasi has worked and studied at numerous medical centers including: The University of Chicago Medical Center and the University of Minnesota Medical Center. Prior to working at North Shore Pediatric Therapy, Dr. Stasi was a faculty member at Rush Presbyterian St. Luke’s Hospital and was a neuropsychologist at the Rush Neurobehavioral Center. Dr. Stasi has extensive experience with the assessment and diagnosis of a variety of conditions including: learning disorder, ADHD, Autism Spectrum Disorders, and social/emotional concerns. Dr. Stasi also serves as a school advocate for parents by providing assistance and case management in order for children with special needs to obtain the most effective school accommodations possible.

More Posts - Website