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The Benefits of Contact Sports: Why Your Kids Should Participate

The football draft just completed and the season is right around the corner. And while it may not seem like it now, summer is almost here. All of this means children are and will be interested in getting out there and participating in organized contact sports. But what about the risks of a concussion or other injury? Blog-Contact Sports-Main-Portrait-01

While the risk of injury will always exist in contact sports, there are also many benefits to sports. Further, much progress has been made regarding awareness, and today, families and coaches have a better understanding of the signs and symptoms of concussions. Many experts agree that the benefits of being active and playing sports outweigh the risks of possible injury.

Benefits of organized contact sports include:

  • Respect: Children learn to listen to and respect teammates, coaches and officials. Also, children learn to follow rules and respect opponents.
  • Teamwork: Organized sports teach children to work with and help teammates in order to achieve a common goal. There is no “I” in team!
  • Discipline: Sports show children that discipline and playing by the rules are valuable assets. Penalties will only set you back!
  • Organization: Participation in organized sports teaches children how to stay organized and responsible. They have to be on time, take care of their equipment, and organize amongst themselves in order to succeed.
  • Protection: Through organized sports, children learn to protect themselves, teammates, and opponents.
  • Confidence: Organized sports improves a child’s self-image and confidence. Moreover, sports teach children that they can improve their performance through hard work and practice, a valuable lesson.

And of course, children benefit from regular exercise and activity. Organized sports increase a child’s physical health and cardiovascular conditioning and decrease the risk of childhood obesity.

Here are some ways you can keep your children safe while they participate in contact sports:

  • Be vocal about safety. Engage coaches, officials, and league organizers in conversations about safe and fair play. Discuss these topics with your children as well.
  • Ensure safe and proper equipment. Depending on the sport, make sure your child is dressed in proper equipment, such as helmets, pads, and proper footwear. Make sure all equipment fits properly in order to maximize safety! Discuss your child’s equipment with coaches and league organizers if you aren’t sure.
  • Be aware of concussion signs and symptoms. Headaches, dizziness, imbalance and nausea are the most frequent indicators of concussions. Unconsciousness is not a requirement!
  • Be aware of concussion treatment guidelines. If a concussion is suspected, stop activity immediately and have the child seen by a doctor as soon as possible. Rest, both physical and mental, are key to recovering from a concussion. That, of course, means a break from physical activity, but it also means a break from school and TV.

With awareness and proper precautions, your child can experience the many benefits of organized contact sports in a safe and fun way!

NSPT offers services in Bucktown, Evanston, Deerfield, Lincolnwood, Glenview, Lake Bluff, Des Plaines, Hinsdale and Mequon! If you have any questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140!

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Rebecca Cohen

Rebecca Cohen

Rebecca Cohen is a licensed physical therapist (DPT) with experience and a passion for working with the pediatric population. She earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in English from the University of Illinois at Chicago and her Doctorate of Physical Therapy from Touro College School of Health Sciences in New York. Before joining North Shore Pediatric Therapy, Rebecca interned at Beth Osten & Associated Pediatric Therapy and at Advocate Children’s Hospital in Park Ridge, Illinois, where she treated pediatric patients with a wide range needs. Most recently, Rebecca worked at Athletico Physical Therapy in Chicago. Rebecca’s passion for working with children extends back as far as she can remember. Rebecca has a niece and nephew, and many young cousins, whom she loves being around and caring for. Rebecca believes her work with the pediatric population is extremely important and rewarding because of the effect it has not only on her patients but on the child’s entire family. When she is not treating patients, Rebecca enjoys spending time with her family, reading, and rooting for the Chicago Bears, Blackhawks and Bulls!

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Moving Away from Positioning Devices in 2017

Obviously, no baby is going to spend 100% of their time playing on the floor or a mat/blanket. At some point you need to cook or shower and you need a place for the baby where they’re safe Blog-Positioning Devices-Main-Landscapefrom the toddler, the dog, or somewhere you know they won’t roll away. This is the time to use the exersaucer, sling seat, or bumbo seat; but try to limit the time spent in these devices to 20-30 minutes per day, collectively.

Here’s why you should consider moving away from positioning devices…

The biggest problem with these devices is children are placed in them well before they have the proper trunk and/or head control to really utilize them properly. With an exersaucer, most babies are also unable to place their feet flat on the bottom but are still pushing up into standing. This can increase extension tone, decrease ankle range of motion/muscle shortening, and can possibly be linked to future toe walking.

With a bumbo or sling seat, the baby is not placed in optimal sitting alignment causing poor sitting posture. While these appear to provide great support and make 4 month old babies look like they can sit independently, the truth is the device isn’t allowing your baby to utilize their core muscles to actively sit.

The bottom line is, if the positioning device is doing all the work, what is your child learning to do?

The best place for your child to play and spend the majority of their time is on the floor or on a blanket/mat. This allows them the opportunity to properly explore their environments and practice typical movement patterns like reaching for their feet, rolling to their side, rolling over, spending time in prone, pivoting, and creeping/crawling.

NSPT offers services in Bucktown, Evanston, Deerfield, Lincolnwood, Glenview, Lake Bluff, Des Plaines, Hinsdale and Mequon! If you have any questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140!

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Jamie Katz

Jamie Katz

Jamie Katz is a physical therapist with an enthusiasm for working with the pediatric population and has both personal and clinical experience in the field. She earned her Bachelor of Science in Biology from The Ohio State University in Columbus, OH and her Doctorate of Physical Therapy from Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, VA. Jamie’s younger brother has Autism and was the inspiration for her journey to become a pediatric physical therapist. She completed a majority of her clinical rotations in the pediatric field including acute care PT at VCU Children’s Hospital and outpatient PT at Children’s Hospital of the King’s Daughters in Virginia Beach, VA. Upon graduation in May 2014, Jamie worked for 7 months at Rehabilitation Associates in Virginia Beach, VA where she treated children in the outpatient and early intervention settings. She began working for North Shore Pediatric Therapy in January 2015. Throughout her pediatric career she has had experience with a wide range of diagnoses, including but not limited to: Torticollis, Cerebral Palsy, Down Syndrome, Autism Spectrum Disorder, Dravet’s Syndrome, Aicardi Syndrome and lack of normal physiological development such as poor core strength, balance, motor planning or coordination.

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Everything Tummy Time

Parents of infants all know that they should be working on tummy time every day from an early age. However, most parents also experience difficulty consistently working on tummy time, since babies are often initially resistant to this position.Blog-Tummy Time-Main-Landscape

Below is a list of reasons why tummy time is so important, even if your child does not initially enjoy the position:

  1. Strength: When a baby is placed on her stomach, she actively works against gravity to lift her head, arms, legs and trunk up from the ground. Activating the muscle groups that control these motions and control the motor skills that your child will learn in tummy time allows for important strengthening of these muscle groups that your baby won’t be able to achieve lying on her back.
  1. Sensory development: Your child will experience different sensory input through the hands, stomach, and face when she is lying on her stomach, which is an integral part of her sensory development. When your baby is on her stomach her head is a different position than she experiences when on her back or sitting up, which helps further develop her vestibular system.
  1. Motor skill acquisition: There are a lot of motor skills that your child will learn by spending time on her stomach. Rolling, pivoting, belly crawling, and creeping (crawling on hands and knees) are just a few of many important motor skills that your child will only learn by spending time on her stomach. Along with being able to explore her environment by learning these new skills, your baby will also create important pathways in the brain to develop her motor planning and coordination that impact development of later motor skills, such as standing and walking.
  1. Head shape: Infants who spend a lot of time on their backs are at risk for developing areas of flattening along the back of the skull. It is recommended that babies sleep on their backs to decrease the risk of sudden infant death syndrome, and since babies spend a lot of time sleeping, they are also already spending a lot of time lying flat on the back. Spending time on the tummy when awake therefore allows for more time with pressure removed from the back of the head, and also helps to develop the neck muscles to be able to independently re-position the head more frequently while lying on the back.

It is important to remember that your child should only spend time on his or her stomach when awake and supervised. Many infants are initially resistant to tummy time because it is a new and challenging position at first. However, by starting with just a few minutes per day at a young age and gradually increasing your child’s amount of tummy time, your child’s tolerance for the position will also improve.

For more tips on how to improve your child’s tummy time, watch our video!

NSPT offers services in Bucktown, Evanston, Deerfield, Lincolnwood, Glenview, Lake Bluff, Des Plaines, Hinsdale and Mequon! If you have any questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140.

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Colleen McCloskey

Colleen McCloskey

Colleen McCloskey is a graduate of Marquette University with her Doctorate in Physical Therapy. While in Milwaukee she spent a few years serving as both as a volunteer and as a student PT serving children from all over the Milwaukee area with a wide variety of physical therapy needs. Before beginning the physical therapy phase of her education, she completed her undergraduate degree at Marquette University in Athletic Training. Through the athletic training program, she participated in numerous internships with Marquette’s varsity sports teams, as well as with a local high school. During her physical therapy education at Marquette, Colleen took part in the Advanced Pediatrics elective, which provided her with opportunities to observe and work with pediatric patients at a number of local inpatient and outpatient pediatric physical therapy clinics. She also completed a research project on the effects of music in pediatric physical therapy, and was given the opportunity to present her findings to a group of physical therapists that work in the Milwaukee public schools. Colleen is passionate about working with children and their families to help them overcome any physical challenges that prevent them from doing the things they love. Outside of work, Colleen loves spending time hiking, running, skiing, snowshoeing or biking with her husband and dog.

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Why Isn’t My Baby Walking?

The walking stage is a huge milestone for every child. It’s an exciting new time when your baby officially becomes a toddler. Most babies learn to walk between 12 and 15 months. A baby isBlog-Walking-Main-Landscape considered delayed in walking once they turn 18 months old. When a child is delayed in a certain gross motor skill, parents are always curious why this delay is happening.

Here are some reasons that your baby may be delayed in walking:

  • Muscle weakness and/or low muscle tone. This is the most common reason. A child who has weakness or low tone in their core and hip muscles may have difficulty with walking. Sometimes this weakness affects the earlier milestones such as crawling, pulling up to stand, and cruising. If your baby had difficulty learning early milestones, they are more likely to have difficulty with walking. A physical therapist can do exercises with your child to strengthen their muscles and help them learn to walk.
  • Orthopedic concerns. This involves the bones and joints in a child’s legs and how they are aligned. An example is hip dysplasia. These concerns are diagnosed by an orthopedic surgeon and are treated in a variety of ways.
  • Neurological concerns. This involves the nerves, muscle fibers, and nervous system of the body. An example is diplegic cerebral palsy. These types of concerns are diagnosed by a neurologist.

Orthopedic and neurologic concerns can be very scary to parents. It is important to understand that a delay in walking does not automatically mean that your child has an orthopedic or neurological disability. If you think your child is delayed in walking, speak to your pediatrician. A pediatric physical therapist can evaluate red flags for causes of delayed walking, as well as help your child to learn this skill.

NSPT offers services in Bucktown, Evanston, Highland Park, Lincolnwood, Glenview, Lake Bluff, Des Plaines, Hinsdale and Milwaukee! If you have questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140.

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Leida Lewis

Leida Lewis

Leida is a physical therapist who earned her doctorate degree from Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine & Science in 2011. She also has a master’s degree in Healthcare Administration & Management. Leida completed her clinical work in the school setting as well as at Lurie’s Children’s Hospital. She has a passion for pediatrics, especially infants and toddlers, and considers torticollis and hypotonia her areas of specialty. Leida has volunteered with children on the Autism Spectrum, at Special Olympic events, and at aquatic therapy group exercise classes. Leida is a huge college football and basketball fan – but only roots for the green and white Michigan State Spartans! In her free time, she enjoys running, competing in triathlons, and camping with her family.

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Why is Toe Walking Bad?

Idiopathic toe walking is a type of walking pattern that occurs when children walk on their tip-toes instead of using the more “typical” heel first pattern. Idiopathic is a term that refers to the fact that this toe walking occurs spontaneously, usually out of habit, and is not due to another medical cause. blog-toe-walking-main-landscape

A non-idiopathic cause may be cerebral palsy, autism, sensory processing disorder, muscular dystrophy or brain injury. As children learn to walk, some toe walking is to be expected. When this becomes a strong habit that they do not grow out of, or the predominant pattern as they are new walkers, then several issues can arise.

The following are negative consequences of toe walking:

  • Tight ankles or contractures can develop
  • Poor balance reactions, frequent falling
  • Muscle imbalances “up the chain” meaning decreased hip or core strength due to the different postural alignment
  • Difficulty with body mechanics including squatting or performing stairs, secondary to tight calve muscles
  • Inability to stand with heels flat on the ground
  • Pain in ankles, knees or hips due to faulty mechanics
  • Surgery, casting, night splinting or daily bracing may be necessary

While some toe walking should not be alarming, the earlier you intervene, the better. Discuss this with your pediatrician or see a physical therapist who can provide early strategies to stop the cascade of effects that can be seen later.

NSPT offers services in Bucktown, Evanston, Highland Park, Lincolnwood, Glenview, Lake Bluff, Des Plaines, Hinsdale and Milwaukee! If you have questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140 and speak to one of our Family Child Advocates!

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Lauren Beeker

Lauren Beeker

Lauren Beeker is a Physical Therapist who loves working with children of all abilities and their families! She earned her Bachelor of Science in Exercise Science and Minor in Education at Saint Louis University, where she also earned her Doctorate of Physical Therapy. Following six wonderful years in St. Louis Lauren relocated to Seattle where she spent over 2 years gaining wonderful pediatric experience in an outpatient pediatric clinic setting and participating in a research project at Seattle Children’s Hospital. Lauren has returned to the Midwest to be closer to family in Indianapolis and found North Shore Pediatric Therapy! Lauren has experience working with children with a variety of abilities and ages including but not limited to children with the following: torticollis and/or plagiocephaly, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, seizure disorders, genetic disorders, autism spectrum disorder, sensory processing disorder, orthopedic conditions/pain, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, post-inpatient rehabilitation for cancer treatment, burns, and traumatic brain injury.

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Importance of Tummy Time

In a national survey of 400 pediatric physical and occupational therapists, two-thirds of those surveyed say they’ve seen an increase in early motor delays in infants who spend too much time onblog-importance-of-tummy-time-main-landscape their back while awake. Tummy time is an important and essential activity for infants to develop the strength and musculature they need to achieve their milestones in gross motor development.

What is tummy time?

  • Supervised time during the day that your baby spends on their tummy while they are awake

Why does my baby need tummy time?

  • Being on his or her tummy will help develop the muscles of the shoulder, neck, trunk, and back. This, in turn, will allow your child to achieve developmental milestones such as independent sitting, crawling, and standing
  • Tummy time will help prevent conditions such as torticollis and plagiocephaly (head flattening on portions of their head)

What if my baby doesn’t like tummy time?

  • The sooner you start tummy time, the sooner your child will get used to it!
  • If your child cannot keep their head up, use a towel roll, Boppy pillow, or small pillows to help prop them up until they can lift their head on their own
  • Place a mirror or their favorite toys in front of them to keep them entertained
  • Put them on your lap on their tummy

How much time do they need on their tummy?

  • You can start putting them on their tummy from day one for up to 5 minutes, 3-5 times a day. As they get stronger, they will be able to tolerate increased tummy time during the day.
  • But, always remember – back to sleep and tummy to play!

NSPT offers services in Bucktown, Evanston, Highland Park, Lincolnwood, Glenview, Lake Bluff, Des Plaines, Hinsdale and Milwaukee! If you have questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140 and speak to one of our Family Child Advocates!

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Arielle Ordonez

Arielle Ordonez

Arielle Ordonez is a licensed physical therapist (DPT) with experience in working with patients that range from pediatric to geriatric populations. She has had experience working in outpatient pediatric and adult orthopedics, acute care, and acute rehabilitation. Arielle has always had a passion for working with the children. She earned her Bachelor of Arts degree from Marquette University in Political Science, and her Doctor of Physical Therapy degree from Marquette University. Arielle spent time in Houston at Texas Children’s Hospital for her Level II Clinical Fieldwork in pediatrics where she treated children with gross developmental delays, Autism Spectrum Disorder, orthopedic conditions, post-surgical impairments, post-concussion syndrome, and amplified musculoskeletal pain syndrome. Arielle is delighted to join the NSPT team to help children reach their milestones and blossom!

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Tummy Time | Facebook Live Video

Join our physical therapist, Leida, for the basics on Tummy Time!

NSPT offers services in Bucktown, Evanston, Highland Park, Lincolnwood, Glenview, Lake Bluff, Des Plaines, Hinsdale and Milwaukee. If you have questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140 and speak to one of our Family Child Advocates!

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North Shore Pediatric Therapy

North Shore Pediatric Therapy

North Shore Pediatric Therapy is a group of experienced and dedicated Thought Leaders in pediatric therapy. We believe passionately in helping each child blossom to their ultimate potential.

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A Small Break from Therapy – What’s the Big Deal?

A major struggle in the therapist world is achieving consistent client attendance. Attendance consistency is needed to build relationships, identify challenging skill areas, make progression within areas of need, create a home program and make modifications to treatment based on the individual’s needs. Without consistency, it can be difficult to achieve long-term goals, and ultimately celebrate with course completion, or therapy graduation! blog-therapy-consistency-main-landscape

We all acknowledge that life happens and sometimes the regularly scheduled appointment time just does not work. Children deserve to have sick time, enjoy a day free of responsibility and schedule, or a chance to play outside on the first nice day. Additionally, summer and holidays are an exciting time to make memories and for the child to learn through experience (us therapists agree-cherish these moments!). When there is an occasional missed therapy day or a break is initiated, the time away can be harmful to their progress. Additionally, it can also be very difficult for the child and family to transition back into the routine of a weekly therapy session. Although it’s an exciting time for families, it’s important to remember how to maintain the progress that’s already been made in therapy.

Think about it this way- there are 7 days or 168 hours in a week. If you are scheduled for one appointment that is an hour long, the child has therapy for 1 out of 168 hours. When it is put into these terms this does not seem like a significant duration, does it? Now if the appointment is missed for just 1 week, then the child will receive therapy for 1 out of 336 hours. Therapy is just a small fraction of their life so their time in the clinic is critical for growth.

What can be done to increase progress and decrease our overall time attending therapy?

  • Increase your frequency to the therapist’s recommendation
  • Be consistent and on time!
  • Make a commitment to your home program and request for updated materials as needed!
  • Reschedule days that are missed (sometimes it may need to be on another therapist’s schedules- this is okay).
  • See if there is an appointment time that better meets yours and your family’s needs
  • Plan ahead and add in extra session if you know of an upcoming vacation

**Please keep in mind cancellations should be done at least 24 to 48 hours in advance, so other families also have the chance to reschedule.

NSPT offers services in Bucktown, Evanston, Highland Park, Lincolnwood, Glenview, Lake Bluff, Des Plaines, Hinsdale and Milwaukee! If you have questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140 and speak to one of our Family Child Advocates!

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Shelly Sears

Shelly Sears

Graduated from Western Michigan University with both her undergraduate and graduate degrees. Shelly has a master’s of science in occupational therapy with a concentration in pediatrics. While in school Shelly had an opportunity to work closely with children who have a variety of functional challenges particularly those with autism, trauma backgrounds, and diverse physical limitations. She also had the opportunity to work as a pediatric home therapist and clinical instructor at a sensory motor facility for several years while in school. Shelly begun working at North Shore Pediatric Therapy at the Glenview location in 2014. More recently she has been certified in Therapeutic Listening through Vital Links to further assist children’s sensory development. As a clinician, Shelly is dedicated to individualize treatment with a concentration on parent education for a holistic experience and optimal care.

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Physical Therapy Month: What do Physical Therapists Treat?

When I tell people that I am a pediatric physical therapist I am often met with a blank, questioning stare. Why could children possibly need physical therapy? When most people think of physical blog-physical therapy-month-main-landscapetherapy, they think of recovering from a back injury or shoulder surgery, or maybe they think of someone in a nursing home going through rehab after a stroke. However, children can often benefit from the services of a physical therapist as well, from newborns all the way through adolescents. Pediatric physical therapists focus on the gross motor development of children, and work to address any limitations that may impact that development.

Pediatric physical therapists therefore work with a wide range of diagnoses and conditions including:

  • Gross motor delay: Development of gross motor skills is an important piece of child development. Since these skills build on one another, a delay with one skill can lead to further delays or difficulty with later skills. Pediatric physical therapists can help your child develop the major gross motor milestones listed below, as well as many more!
    • Rolling
    • Sitting
    • Crawling
    • Standing
    • Walking
    • Running
    • Jumping
  • Torticollis and plagiocephaly: Torticollis is a condition that occurs when there is asymmetrical muscle length and strength in a baby’s neck muscles, and therefore limits symmetrical neck motion. Plagiocephaly, or asymmetrical head shape, often occurs when a child has torticollis, as a result of frequent pressure being put on only one part of the head. A pediatric physical therapist can help to stretch and strengthen the child’s neck in order to promote symmetrical motion and head shape.
  • Balance and coordination disorders: Limitations in balance and coordination can have a significant impact on a child’s ability to develop motor skills, as well as to safely negotiate his or her natural environments. A pediatric physical therapist can treat these limitations to allow for improved functioning and safety.
  • Neurological disorders: A neurological disorder occurs when there is abnormal functioning of the body’s nerves, spinal cord, or brain. These are just a few of the disorders that a pediatric physical therapist can treat.
    • Cerebral palsy
    • Spina bifida
    • Traumatic brain injury
    • Spinal cord injury
  • Orthopedic conditions: Children get hurt too! Even though children tend to be more resilient to injury then adults, children who suffer an injury or require surgery can also benefit from physical therapy services to help restore function to the musculoskeletal system.
    • Post-injury
    • Post-surgery
    • Scoliosis
  • Genetic disorders: Genetic mutations may result in impaired development and functioning in children, and can therefore be addressed through intervention with a pediatric physical therapist. While there is a wide range of genetic disorders and their resulting impact on child development, below are a few examples of genetic disorders where a pediatric physical therapist is typically a part of the child’s team of providers.
    • Down syndrome
    • Duchenne muscular dystrophy
    • Prader-Willi syndrome
  • Gait abnormalities: The way a child’s lower extremity bones and muscles develop have a large impact on the child’s gait mechanics. Abnormalities with gait, such as toe-walking, can be addressed by a pediatric physical therapist.
  • Many more! If you are unsure of whether your child may benefit from the services of a pediatric physical therapist, speak with your pediatrician or reach out to a pediatric physical therapist near you.

NSPT offers services in Bucktown, Evanston, Highland Park, Lincolnwood,Glenview, Lake Bluff, Des Plaines, Hinsdale and Milwaukee! If you have questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140 and speak to one of our Family Child Advocates!

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Colleen McCloskey

Colleen McCloskey

Colleen McCloskey is a graduate of Marquette University with her Doctorate in Physical Therapy. While in Milwaukee she spent a few years serving as both as a volunteer and as a student PT serving children from all over the Milwaukee area with a wide variety of physical therapy needs. Before beginning the physical therapy phase of her education, she completed her undergraduate degree at Marquette University in Athletic Training. Through the athletic training program, she participated in numerous internships with Marquette’s varsity sports teams, as well as with a local high school. During her physical therapy education at Marquette, Colleen took part in the Advanced Pediatrics elective, which provided her with opportunities to observe and work with pediatric patients at a number of local inpatient and outpatient pediatric physical therapy clinics. She also completed a research project on the effects of music in pediatric physical therapy, and was given the opportunity to present her findings to a group of physical therapists that work in the Milwaukee public schools. Colleen is passionate about working with children and their families to help them overcome any physical challenges that prevent them from doing the things they love. Outside of work, Colleen loves spending time hiking, running, skiing, snowshoeing or biking with her husband and dog.

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How Multidisciplinary Treatment Helps Children with Autism

There are many benefits to providing children with Autism a collaboration of different therapies in addition to Applied Behavior Analysis services. blog-autism-main-landscape

  • Occupational therapy (OT) provides children with skills to help regulate themselves. These skills may help decrease inappropriate stims and help provide children with more socially acceptable skills for regulation.
    • OT can provide children with strategies to help with motor skills.
    • OT can have a different perspective on activities of daily living and as such can provide different and alternative interventions to increase independence on self-care activities.
    • OT improves children independent living skills, such as self-care.
  • Speech therapy can help children with functional communication skills. Speech and Language Pathologists (SLPs) can provide additional support to the children to develop communication skills.
    • SLPs may also provide education and the introduction of alternatives to vocal communication in the form of augmentative devices or picture exchange communication system (PECS).
  • Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) develops personal one-on-one interventions for children to develop functional skills.
    • ABA focuses on helping children with social, academic, and behavioral concerns.
    • ABA will also focus on providing children with skills for functional communication.
  • Physical therapy (PT) can help provide children with additional motor function and can help with children who have low muscle town or balance issues.
    • PT can also help with coordination for children.
  • Collaboration of all therapies can help ensure that the most effective treatment is provided to the child in all settings.

Fusion of all therapies will provide children exposure to different strategies and interventions in different settings to help with day-to-day life.

NSPT offers services in Bucktown, Evanston, Highland Park, Lincolnwood, Glenview, Lake Bluff, Des Plaines, Hinsdale and Milwaukee! If you have questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140 and speak to one of our Family Child Advocates!

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Sumita Singh

Sumita Singh

Sumita Singh is an Applied Behavioral Analyst (ABA) Programming Supervisor. Prior to coming to NSPT, Sumita earned her Bachelors of Arts from Benedictine University and went on to complete her Masters of Science in Applied Behavior Analysis from The Chicago School of Professional Psychology. Sumita has a passion, strong advocacy, and love for working with children and is dedicated to helping her clients blossom and reach their full potential. Sumita comes to NSPT with over 5 years of experience working with children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) both in the home and school environments. Sumita sees her work as a calling, not a career; this is exemplified in her outside activities outside of NSPT. In her free time, Sumita has devoted her time as a volunteer with A Giving Heart Foundation (AGHF), a non-profit organization previously affiliated with Rush Hospital. We are sure you will appreciate Sumita’s positive energy and look forward to working together to help your child blossom.

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