How to Explain a Language Disorder to a Teacher

Of all the categories available under IDEA law, language impairments are often one of the most difficult to understand. It is not a surface level issue and is often lost in the shuffle. Explaining what a language disorder is and how it will impact your child to a teacher can be tricky. Here are some tips.

How to Explain a Language Disorder to a Teacher:

  1. Language disorders come in a wide variety of cases. Each child will present differently and as an advocate, you need to do your best to describe your child’s needs specifically. Language disorders can impact a child’s ability to verbally express themselves efficiently, effectively and with appropriate grammar. It can result in difficulty understanding sentences, following directions, asking/answering questions or in a number of other impairments.
  2. Enlist the school Speech Language Pathologist. Ask for help in explaining the disorder to the teacher and ask for ideas. Discuss options for adjustments and supports for your child like a visual schedule, repetitions of the directions or having him repeat the direction back to the teacher to ensure comprehension. Many school districts or state programs have materials and resources that can educate teachers on strategies to ensure better classroom learning.
  3. Remind the teacher to notice how your child interacts socially. Teachers will be able to identify a child that is isolating themselves from peers secondary to trouble communicating with them.
  4. Discuss the difference between listening, understanding and attending. One of the biggest complaints of teachers will be “He’s not listening to me!” As often as not, your child does not understand the direction provided and is not complying simply because he does not know what is required of him. It can be very frustrating to have difficulty communicating effectively and patience will go a long way.
  5. Know your child’s IEP or 504 plan and take the opportunity to discuss it with the teacher. Be specific about the types of services and accommodations he will receive and what they will look like in the classroom.

Remember, be proactive and provide as much information up front about your child and his diagnosis to avoid potential difficulties. Refer to this page from the National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities for 8 Tips for Teachers who have students with speech and language issues in the classroom.