Posts

how to talk to your child about neuropsychological testing

What Should I Tell My Child About Neuropsychological Testing?

One question that I have parents asking me all the time about coming in for testing is this: “What do I tell my child?” There really is no universal answer to this question.  The answer has to be based upon what the child can handle.  How old is the child? What is the child’s cognitive functioning? Just to name a couple…

The goal is to speak to the child at a level that he or she can understand.  It is important to not lie or cover up the reasons for the visit.  Many times parents attend an intake session because of concerns regarding the child’s academic performance.  It is important to be upfront with the child.  Children areWhat to tell a child about Neuropsychological testing quite intuitive and know a lot more than we often give them credit for.   I would first have parents ask the child general questions (it is important to do this, even if they already know the answers since this serves to prime the child’s memory):  any combination of the below questions might serve to help guide the child.

Questions to Ask Your Child Before a Neuropsychology Evaluation:

  • “Do you like going to school?”
  • “What is hard about school?”
  • “Are you happy with your grades?”
  • “Is it hard to listen and pay attention to the teacher?”
  • “Does it bother you to have to play alone?”

Once the child admits to one or more of the questions, it is then appropriate to explain that the purpose of testing or therapy is to help address the specific issues and make school more enjoyable.

After the child understands the purpose for the testing or therapy, it is always important to explain to him or her what the actual session will look like.  I always advise parents to ask the individual that will be working with your child lots of questions.  Find out who will be doing the work, where will the work take place, how long would the child be there, are there breaks available, and what will the child actually be doing.  The goal is that the child will be ready for testing or therapy and have a basic idea of what to expect.

Click here for a guide to understanding Neuropsychological Test Results. 


Neuropsychology testing IL

NSPT offers services in BucktownEvanstonHighland ParkLincolnwoodGlenview and Des Plaines. If you have questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140 and speak to one of our Family Child Advocates today!

What is a 504 Plan?

I have received several telephone calls over the past few weeks from anxious parents about their child’s school wanting to create a 504 Plan in the academic setting.  Many times parents are not informed about what this means or about possible benefits that might be exhibited from such a plan.

What is a 504 Plan?

Section 504 is part of the Rehabilitation act of 1973 which was designed to protect the rights of individuals with disabilities in any facility that receives federal financial assistance.  What this means for a school age child is that the school is unable to deny academic services to a child because of a specific disability.  These plans were originally established for children with medical concerns such as being confined to a wheelchair or having a medical condition such as a seizure disorder.  Today, it is quite likely that the main reason 504 Plans are offered to children are from diagnoses of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

 How do 504 Plans and IEPs Differ?

There are a few major differences between a 504 Plan and an Individual Education Plan (IEP).  A child with an IEP has significant academic concerns in which he or she requires intervention from either a learning resource teacher, or specific therapist such as a speech and language therapist.  The 504 Plan should be thought of as accommodations within the classroom setting to help address the specific concerns that a child may exhibit.  These accommodations are designed such that the child’s academic demands are the same as his or her peers but there is assistance given such that the child can reach his or her academic potential. Read more