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Signs of a Sensory Issue and Who Can Help

Everyone (children and adults both) have sensory issues and concerns.  As adults, we often learn to avoid noxious sensory inputs that we find to be bothersome.  Oftentimes, children are unable to avoid the sensory concerns that they find to be bothersome.  These sensory concerns can at times have a significant impact on a child’s social, emotional, and academic functioning.  Parents and educators are often unsure of when to actually seek help or what help to seek.

Questions to think about your child’s ability to deal with sensory input include the following:

  1. Does he have trouble with bright lights?  (has to have sun glasses at all times outside)
  2. Does he hate being touched?  (avoids hugs and contact from others)
  3. Does she seek out constant contact from others? (always wants to be hugged)
  4. Does he talk too loudly or too softly?

If you answer yes to any of these questions, it may prove beneficial to have your child evaluated.  Pediatric Occupational Therapists are often well trained in the assessment and intervention of sensory concerns.  They can  often work with the child to develop tolerance to the avoidant stimuli while also providing accommodations within his or her environment that help the child.

It is important to always keep in mind that there may be other medical or psychological concerns evident.  If you suspect that there may be something in addition to sensory concerns, have a consultation with the occupational therapist in order to determine if additional assessments or interventions are needed.

Additionally, don’t rule out ADHD and many other very associated issues.  You can learn more by visiting a pediatric neuropsychologist who can pinpoint the best treatment strategy.

Click here to download your Sensory Processing Disorder Red Flag Checklist.

Neuropsychology Posts

What to Expect After Neuropsychological Testing

The process of going through a neuropsychological evaluation can be tiring and time consuming.  This process is long-starting fromWhat to expect from neuropsychological testing concerns brought up by the teacher, sharing the information with the pediatrician, getting a referral, meeting with the neuropsychologist, having the child participate in the comprehensive evaluation, and meeting at the end for feedback.  This process may take weeks or months to fully complete.

It is important to understand that the neuropsychological evaluation is really the start of the process.

The focus of the evaluation is to provide information and diagnostic clarification about what is going on with a child’s behavior or learning.  Once the evaluation is completed, the entire process of help and change begins. Read more