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help your child learn to listen

Help Your Child Learn to Listen

If you spend a frequent amount of time with a young child, you know that one of the most common directions you find yourself saying is, “LISTEN!” Telling a child to listen seems like an easy enough request, right? When in actuality, listening is a skill that children have to develop and improve upon as they age.

When a child carries out a direction incorrectly there are many different factors that could be preventinglearn to listen his or her ability to be successful. Successful listening requires adequate attention and motivation to the current situation. If those components are not present, comprehension or retention of what is said will not be optimal. The best way to help a child be more successful is to teach them how to attend to what is being said. If your child is struggling to follow directions at home or at school, use the following four strategies to help them attend to the information that is being presented to him and her, which will ultimately help them become more skilled listeners and be more successful.

Strategies to help your child attend/listen:

  1. Look at the speaker – Make eye contact with the person who is talking.
  2. Quiet body – Keep your mouth, hands and feet quiet or still.
  3. Think about what is being said – Echo the directions in your mind or out loud. Repeating directions is a good strategy as it increases the retention of the presented information.
  4. Ask if you don’t understand – It’s important for children to develop self-advocacy skills and to feel confident when asking for clarification or extra help.

Use the visual aid to the right as a remainder for kids to use their listening strategies. This can be printed off and taped on his or her desk or hung on the refrigerator. The more the strategies are referenced, the more a child will become familiar with them and start to use them.

It is possible that there may be an underlying issue behind a child’s poor listening skills, such as language comprehension deficits, an auditory processing disorder or even an undiagnosed hearing loss. Consult with your child’s speech-language pathologist if a child continues to struggle with following directions or listening in the classroom.


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NSPT offers services in BucktownEvanstonHighland ParkLincolnwoodGlenview and Des Plaines. If you have questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140 and speak to one of our Family Child Advocates today!

Helping Your Client to Optimally Attend: Advice for Pediatric Therapists

“Show me you’re ready!” As a Pediatric Occupational Therapist, I can’t even begin to guess how many times this utterance is repeatedchild attending throughout my day in the therapy gym. While I’m sure that my clients think I sound like a broken record, the bottom line is that if they’re not ready to pay attention, they’re not going to learn what I’m teaching.  What does it look like when a client is ready to attend?  Here are three important ways for young clients to show you, their therapist, they are ready to work and learn.

Three Tips to Gain Maximum Attention from Pediatric Therapy Clients:

  1. Ready Body: The body is still and facing the person who is speaking. It is not jumping, running, or facing other areas of the room. Read more