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White Sox Benetti

Living the Dream | An Interview With Chicago White Sox Announcer Jason Benetti

Every day at NSPT, we welcome families into our clinics. Each child is so incredibly unique with their Jason-Benettitreatment, their diagnosis, the challenges they may face, the strengths that they have, etc. We are often told by parents that their biggest question is “what’s next for their child?” “Will they succeed in life?” At NSPT, our mission is to help each and every kiddo reach their maximum potential…whatever that may be.

Jason Benetti, the newest addition to the broadcasting team for the Chicago White Sox, is living his own childhood dream. At a young age, Jason was diagnosed with Cerebral Palsy. Like our families, there was a point in time where maybe his family had the same questions about “what’s next?” He recalls at a young age going through a few surgeries and spending time at the Rehab Institute of Chicago. “Everyone there was just wonderful,” said Benetti. A typical week at a young age included Physical and Occupational Therapy and focusing on building range of motion.

Benetti grew up on the Southside in Homewood and is a graduate of Homewood-Flossmoor High School. Initially, he was a member of the band playing tuba. “That probably wasn’t the best thing for me to be doing,” joked Benetti. It was at that time the band director asked him if he would be interested in sitting in the press box during games and calling out the next set as the band was performing. This was the beginning of a growing passion for broadcasting. Homewood-Flossmoor was one of few high schools that had their own radio station, so Benetti was able to further pursue and develop his skills.

Upon graduation, Jason attended Syracuse University to pursue a career in broadcasting. While there, he was able to continue to build his skills as the Triple A announcer for the Toronto Blue Jays. But nothing fits quite like being able to land your dream job with your favorite team growing up. We were able to sit down with Jason and ask him about what it’s like to be a broadcaster for his hometown team, the Chicago White Sox.

Were there any broadcasters you wanted to be like growing up?

Benetti: There were a lot of people, Hawk Harrelson was the guy I would mimic with catchphrases walking around saying, and “You can put it on the board, YES!” But I’m not particularly a catch phrase guy myself. So Hawk was the guy. He has been so encouraging of me doing half of the games with Steve Stone, just genuine and kind.

When you first expressed interest, what did people around you say? Was there adversity or support?

Benetti: As a radio guy, no one cared what I looked like. Viv Bernstein did a story in early 2010 and asked me if there was a ceiling with regards to TV. It took time for people to warm up to the fact that I can’t look into the camera or have a commanding strut walking into a room, so perceptively there was an adjustment period for people. I quickly found great allies with Time Warner in Syracuse and ESPN. Once they got to know me, they were supportive. It just takes one person.

If you could call a game for any baseball player, who would it be? Retired or current.

Benetti: Growing up Robin Ventura was my favorite player, so in a way, I now get to call games for him.

What are you most looking forward to this season?

Benetti: I’m looking forward to the development of the rapport between myself and Steve Stone. We have only had one game so far, but I felt comfortable after and am excited to have the partnership develop. Steve has such a wealth of knowledge. It’s going to be a lot of fun.

What was it like sitting in the booth at US Cellular Field for the first time?

Benetti: It was just like another game, but with way more people interested. I’ve done so many baseball games and baseball is baseball. There weren’t really nerves, just a new experience.

What is it like working alongside hall of fame broadcaster Steve Stone?

Benetti: Anyone who is creative grows up wanting to be around other people like that. Steve Stone and crew fulfills that 100 percent. To be in a room with everyone wanting to do great work, to work with someone who expands like Steve, is everything anyone could want in a partner doing games.

Do you ever meet with or talk to young athletes? Or young individuals with CP or other disabilities? What is the one thing you tell them?

Benetti: I would tell them if you think people perceive you a certain way, you are not crazy and they might be, but do everything you can to disregard that and get past it, it could be damaging to the relationship. It is happening, but trust yourself to get past it.

And one final question…you heard it here first…Prediction…will it be a Cubs vs. White Sox World Series?

Benetti: I’m going to say yeah, it would be great fun. The Billy Goat couldn’t be blamed. Someone would have huge bragging rights for a long time.

NSPT offers services in BucktownEvanstonHighland ParkLincolnwoodGlenview, Lake Bluff and Des Plaines. If you have questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140 and speak to one of our Family Child Advocates today!

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night splints

The Quick Guide to Night Splints for Children

 

 

 

For many children who are idiopathic toe-walkers, physical therapists often take the conservative approach. We have many things in our arsenal to help children improve without undergoing costly and painful surgery. Outside of stretching and strengthening exercises, we might recommend ankle foot orthoses (AFOs) for day time and/or night time wear. Depending on the child’s range of motion measurements, walking mechanics, and underlying pathology, different types of orthotics might be recommended. We often work closely with orthotists (professionals who design medical supportive devices such as braces) to make sure each child receives the individualized care and equipment he needs to gain full function and optimal alignment.

Here are reasons why your physical therapist might have recommended night splints for your child:

  1. The main goals of physical therapy interventions for toe-walkers are to increase ankle dorsiflexion range of motion and to decrease possible contractures that are associated with the condition. Physical therapy exercise programs include stretching the calf muscles, strengthening the trunk muscles, manual therapy, treadmill training, balance training, and ankle mobility training. Sometimes, in stubborn cases of toe-walking, orthotics are needed to maintain the range of motion gained throughout daily exercise sessions.
  2.  If you’ve ever tried to stretch your pre-schooler’s muscles, you know that children can be active and fidgety. They don’t tolerate passive stretches as well as adults and might complain of boredom, pain, or ticklishness. The most effective stretches are those held for a prolonged period of time at a joint’s end range. Night splints allow for increased stretch time at the ankle joint, because the child is sleeping or resting when they are in place.
  3. The best time to gain range is when a child is relaxed. Since children relax more during sleep, even more range can be gained through passive stretching using a night time AFO.
  4. This is where the night-time splint comes in. While the daytime AFO is a rigid orthosis that keeps your child’s ankles from plantarflexing (pointing down) past neutral while he walks, the night time AFO is a much more dynamic system. Night splints can be adjusted as the ankles gain more range into dorsiflexion. They provide a low-load, prolonged-duration stretch that helps with contracture reduction and counters high tone.
  5. In the literature, night splints have been found to be effective for contractures at a variety of joints, and can be useful in brachial plexus injuries, cerebral palsy, and muscular dystrophy.

As pediatric physical therapists, we rarely recommend over-the-counter orthotics for your child’s orthopedic needs. By consulting with an orthotist, we make sure each child is fitted to the most comfortable and developmentally appropriate custom foot wear for his condition. Usually, children who adhere to a strict physical therapy program and who receive the right orthoses can see a complete change to their posture and gait mechanics in as short as 6 months’ time.

Click here to view our gross motor milestones infographic!

References:
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Evidence-based care guideline for management of idiopathic toe walking in children and young adults ages 2 through 21 years. Cincinnati (OH): Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center; 2011 Feb 15. 17 p. [49 references]

Arm with kinesiotape

What is Kinesio® Tape and why is it used on children?

Physical therapists and occupational therapists often use Kinesio® Tape on their clients as an adjunct to therapy. So what is Kinesio® Tape? You might have seen this colorful tape on Olympic athletes in various locations and various patterns. It is an elastic tape that has multiple purposes depending on where and how it is applied. It is often used to reduce pain, swelling, improve strength, encourage optimal alignment, and decrease muscle fatigue.  Kinesio® Tape can be used at full tension like regular athletic tape. However, it is the elastic qualities of Kinesio® Tape that make it therapeutic.

Properties of Kinesio® Tape:

-Latex free
-Variable tension depending on function
-Adhesive is medical grade acrylic and heat sensitive
-Allows for free movement instead of restricted movement like regular athletic tape
-Similar elasticity as human skin, so it can stay on for days to maximize its full effect

Purpose of Kinesio® Tape:

-To hold a joint in optimal position to help an overstretched or overworked muscle to rest and return to its most efficient length.
-Keeping a body part in better alignment helps the muscles contract and work in a less stressful fashion during daily activities.
-To increase input to the skin around a specific muscle or joint. With this new proprioceptive input, more awareness of that body part leads to more strength.
-To help relax an overused muscle which helps reduce pain and swelling
-Improve lymphatic flow and reduce edema and bruising, allowing for accelerated healing

Who can benefit:

People with a variety of orthopedic, neuromuscular, or medical conditions, such as:

-Cerebral Palsy
-Conditions with weakness or paralysis of a certain body part
-Down Syndrome
-Gross Motor Developmental Delay
-Children with gait abnormalities such as toe-walking, flat feet, hyperextension, etc.
-Low muscle tone
-Decreased coordination
-Brain injury
-Torticollis
-Lymphedema
-Painful orthopedic injury
-Poor posture
-And many more…

Not only is Kinesio® Tape safe for use on children, I have found Kinesio® Taping to be extremely beneficial and valuable to my clinical practice.  This elastic tape can be left on for 3-4 days after application. Often times, I put it on at the end of a session to help my clients retain the gains we made during the session. In a way, it improves carryover from week to week, and brings the physical effects of therapy home. With babies, this “reminder” is especially important, as they are still working on their neuromuscular control and cannot make a conscious effort to contract a certain muscle or hold a specific position during their play activities. With children, the colorful tape gives them a fun visual cue to increase use of a certain body part and strengthen those all important neuromuscular connections.

Reference:

Kase, K, Martin, P, Yasukawa, A. Kinesio®Taping in Pediatrics. 2006. Kinesio® USA , LLC. 16-19.


The Rewards of Adaptive Bicycles for Children

Bicycle or tricycle riding is an important component of childhood. For certain children with medical complexities, there are special equipment that enable them to explore the world just like any other child.

When I was working as a physical therapist on the pediatric floor of a rehabilitation hospital, I encountered many children and families impacted by debilitating conditions and circumstances. From cerebral palsy and brain injury, to spinal injury, or cancer, many of the children I met proved that being physically and cognitively limited did not keep them from participating in stimulating play activities.

Adaptive tricycles are designed to provide less able-bodied children a way to exercise their limbs, practice their skills and encourage their participation. 

They often come with various features and accessories such as extra wide frames, trunk reinforcement, head support, leg straps, hand straps, steering assist, etc. They make it possible for children who have low muscle tone, motor control, coordination, or cognitive function to engage in locomotion.

How Can an Adaptive Bicycle Help?

For children with diagnoses that reduce their trunk control, adaptive bikes provide a safe environment where they can work on coordinating their limbs while having their back fully supported or strapped in.  For children who fatigue easily due to their medical conditions, adaptive bikes offer the option of having an adult help steer from behind.  For children who lack the motor control to alternately pedal their legs, foot straps and connected pedals make the reciprocal motion easier by putting muscles and joints through those much needed ranges. Depending on the type of bike, adaptive handles can also accommodate all kinds of grip. So when a child with upper body weakness has a hard time grasping or holding the handlebars to steer a regular bike, an adaptive bike allows them more control of their locomotion.

Durable wheels and a parking brake make adaptive bikes safe for children with a wide range of physical abilities and conditions.  Children with medical complexities who are restricted to a wheelchair can still benefit from rides in an adaptive bike.  Aerobic training and upright posture, as well as limb movements (facilitated or self-initiated), are an essential part of the growth and rehabilitation process for children of all different capabilities. All of this is made easy by special equipment such as the adaptive bike. Being outside and being able to participate in activities with other children promote emotional health and create positive environments for mental and physical growth.

The Rewards of Using Adaptive Bicycles

I have watched many children blossom behind the wheel of an adaptive bicycle. Taking part in that transition is such a rewarding process.  Children who were unable to move certain parts of their bodies after an injury were eventually able to transfer what they learned during cycling to standing and walking tasks. Toddlers who were never able to stand on their own were able to experience, for the first time, limb movements and self-propulsion locomotion. Seeing the smiles on their faces, and hearing the laughter of their parents and siblings… Those moments definitely made my job worthwhile.

Are Premature Babies Delayed?

The term premature refers to any infant that was born earlier than 37 weeks of gestation. Premature births occur in 10% of all live births. Premature babies (“preemies”) are at risk for multiple health problems, including breathing difficulties, cerebral palsy, learning disabilities, and delays in their gross and fine motor skills.

Premature baby

Why are babies born pre-term?

The cause of premature labor is not fully understood. However, there are certain risk factors that can increase the likelihood of premature labor: a woman that has experienced premature labor with a previous birth, a woman that is pregnant with multiples (twins, triplets, etc), and a woman with cervical or uterine defects. Certain health problems can also increase the risk of premature labor, including diabetes, high blood pressure and preeclampsia, obesity, in-vitro fertilization, and a short time period between pregnancies.

What are the effects of being born pre-term?

In addition to multiple medical complications, a baby that is born before 37 weeks of gestation is at risk for developmental problems in gross motor skills, fine motor skills, sensory integration, speech and language skills, and learning. The baby may take longer to reach specific developmental milestones or need help to reach those milestones. The earlier babies are born, the more at risk they are for having delays. Each child is different as well, and no two preemies will be delayed in exactly the same manner.

If you or your pediatrician suspects that your baby is developmentally delayed, there are a variety of professionals that can assist your child in achieving his or her full potential. A physical therapist can help facilitate development of gross motor milestones such as sitting, crawling, walking, running, or jumping. An occupational therapist can help develop fine motor skills such as object manipulation, hand-eye coordination, and reaching, as well as sensory integration. Speech therapists can help improve language skills and articulation.  Consult with your pediatrician or talk with one of our Family Child Advocates to receive more information on setting up an evaluation with a skilled therapist at NSPT.

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Toe Walkers Part 1: What are Reasons Children Toe Walk | Pediatric Therapy Tv

In today’s Webisode, a pediatric physical therapist explains why children may walk on their toes.

Learn more from this blog called “Is Toe Walking Normal?”

In this video you will learn:

  • How sensory input is related to toe walking
  • What is muscular dystrophy
  • What is idiopathic toe walking

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now, your host, here’s Robyn.

Robyn: Hello, and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I’m your host, Robyn Ackerman, and I’m standing here today with Colleen Kearns, a Pediatric Physical Therapist. Colleen, can you give our viewers an explanation of why some children toe walk?

Colleen: Of course, Robyn. There are three main reasons why children may toe walk. The first one is related to sensory issues. Some children may actually be hypersensitive to certain textures on the floors that they are walking on, and the surfaces that they are walking on. So if that occurs, they may be more prone to walk on their toes to avoid those uncomfortable textures.

On the other hand, they may also be seeking extrasensory input. Maybe, some kids need a little bit more of the sensory input, and by walking on their toes they are locking their ankles and knees, and by doing that, they are actually getting more input from their joints. So that’s also why children with autism will walk on their toes, to get that extrasensory input.

The second main reason that children toe walk is due to an underlying diagnosis. Muscular dystrophy is a big one. That’s a genetic disorder where the muscle tissue is destroyed and it’s actually replaced by fat, and the calf muscles are often the first ones to be involved with that. So children with muscular dystrophy will toe walk in an effort to stabilize, due to the decreased strength. Any condition that results in an abnormal increase in muscle tone will also result in toe walking. A common one with that would be cerebral palsy.

The third reason why kids may toe walk is actually unknown. Some children, who don’t have an underlying diagnosis and don’t have sensory issues, just prefer to walk on their toes, and that’s what we call idiopathic toe walking, which means we just don’t know. Unfortunately, they can get into a very strong habit of doing it, and when they do that it results in a shortening of the muscles in their calf, and that actually makes it harder for the child to be able to get their foot flat on the ground. And when that happens, it’s kind of like a vicious cycle. They are more likely to be walking on their toes because they have a strong habit, then their muscles get shorter, then it’s harder for them to walk on their flat feet, so then they are even more prone to walking on their toes.

Robyn: All right. Well, thank you so much, and thank you to our viewers. And remember, keep on blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit our website at learnmore.me. That’s Learnmore.me.