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How To Make a Weighted Animal

Here at North Shore Pediatric Therapy, we utilize weighted objects for a countless number of activities. They can be used as a self-regulation strategy, providing deep proprioceptive input to your child’s muscles and joints.  Various weighted materials, including vests, belts, blankets, wrist-weights and ankle-weights, are utilized in the clinic multiple times throughout the sock puppetsday. For all of you crafty parents, as well as those who (like me) are “creatively challenged,” below are some DIY instructions to follow so that you can create your very own, personalized weighted animal.

4 Steps To Create Your Very Own Weighted Animal:

Step 1: Find an old knee-high sock. You can choose a sock that is your child’s favorite color or has their favorite cartoon characters on it.
Step 2: Fill the sock with a grainy material, such as rice or sand. Put enough rice in your sock so it is four-fifths of the way full. Tie the open end of the sock closed. There should be enough rice in the sock so when it is draped across your child’s shoulders, it droops down onto their chest. This activity has the added benefit of incorporating direction-following and tactile play into your daily routine.
Step 3: Finally, decorate the sock with “googley eyes” and markers. The sky is the limit as far as whether your sock animal has polka-dots, stripes, zig-zags or checkers.
Step 4: Kick back and relax with your very own personalized weighted animal.

These strategies can be utilized when your child is feeling frustrated or having a difficult time organizing their thoughts. Your child’s weighted animal can also be used for strengthening. When at home, have your child carry the animal around the house or encourage them to sustain various Yoga poses while holding their animal friend. The added resistance while sustaining these poses will only help build muscle strength and improve motor planning. Whether your weighted animal is used as a self-regulation strategy or a strengthening tool, it is up to you and your child’s interests. In either case, creating the animal is a wonderful craft to save for a rainy day and a great way to get the whole family involved. Make one, make two or make a whole zoo of weighted animals. Your child’s new friend is sure to be a hit and cherished companion for years to come.

How To Tie A Shoe Part 2 | Pediatric Therapy Tv

IN TODAY’S WEBISODE, A PEDIATRIC OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST SHOWS US THE  SECOND PART IN TEACHING CHILDREN “HOW TO TIE THEIR SHOES”.   CLICK HERE TO READ A BLOG WITH HOW TO STEPS ON SHOE TYING:

Click here to watch part 1 of the How To Teach Shoe Tying Video

In This Video You Will Learn:

  • The step by step guide of teaching a child How To Tie a Shoe

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide
audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and
innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn.

Robyn: Hello and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I’m your host, Robyn
Ackerman. In today’s segment, Marissa Edwards, pediatric
occupational therapist, will be showing us how to teach tying a
shoe. Marissa?

Marissa: Hi. This is part two of “Teaching Your Child How To Tie Their
Shoes.” The story that I use is “The Pirate Story” and I’m going
to go through that story with you right now. You can also find
this on the ADVANCE for Occupational Therapists website.

We start with the laces separated and we say, ‘X marks the
spot’. Then we have to put the key inside the treasure chest,
and we have to hurry up and lock it tight because the pirates
are coming. Then we find an island because we need to bury our
treasure.

We find an island, and we have to walk around the island to make
sure there are no pirates on the island. Then we take our shovel
– there are no pirates, by the way – we take our shovel, we dig
into the island, and then we have to bury it really, really
deep. And that’s it.

Robyn: Thank you, Marissa, and thank you to our viewers. And remember,
keep on blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of
mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To
subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit
our website at LearnMore.me. That’s LearnMore.me.

To watch more Pediatric Therapy TV Webisodes Click Here!

Eight Tips For Helping Your Sensory Sensitive Child While Dining Out

Family With Young Children At RestaurantEnjoying family meals out at a restaurant can be a lot of fun. However, for some children, this experience can also be a source of sensory overload with all the sights, sounds, smells and movement throughout the restaurant. Below are a few ideas to help you and your child have a pleasurable meal at your favorite neighborhood spot!

How to Make A Restaurant Manageable For Your Child

  1. Engage in heavy work at home such as frog jumps, wheelbarrow walks, or household chores before going to your meal
  2. Use a Lap Lander or Sensory Snuggle to provide deep pressure input Read more

How To Calm Your Child Down Before Bed

Bedtime can be a challenging process for parents and children alike. Many children have a difficult time calming their bodies down before they go to sleep – their engines are often going too fast around bedtime, and this can cause frustration for everyone involved. Here are some strategies that parents and caregivers can use to make bedtime easier.

Calming Strategies for BedtimeCalm Sleeping Boy

  • Use a visual schedule for the bedtime routine so that the child knows what to expect and can feel more organized.
  • Incorporate heavy work activities in the bedtime routine such as wheelbarrow walking; animal walks (e.g. bear walk, crab walk) or have your child help with evening chores like wiping the table after dinner, carrying the dishes, or putting heavier items away in the cupboard.
  • Make your child into a “sandwich” or “hot dog” by wrapping their body tightly in a big blanket and applying deep pressure with a big hug.
  • Dim the lights and play quiet music before bed to calm Read more