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How does rhyming help your child read?

How Does Rhyming Help My Child Read?

How does rhyming help my child read? Much like any other skill, children need to set a strong foundation of pre-literacy skills before learning to read. These children need to understand the alphabetic principle, or the awareness of letter-sound correspondence. Before being successful readers, children must also learn about phonological awareness, or the understanding that sentences are made up of words, words are made up parts (syllables), and each syllable has distinctive sounds.

A subset of phonological awareness is phonemic awareness, or the ability to manipulate sounds to change word meaning, make new words, or even segment and then blend sounds together to make words.

Rhyming is a key step for emerging readers. Once children begin to understand rhyming, they are one step closer to reading.

How can you help your child with rhyming?How does rhyming help your child read?

Read! Providing opportunities for children to hear rhymes as they naturally occur and predict what word might come next, children will begin to associate rhyming and reading with fun! Children will develop the appropriate framework for rhyming and learn how to generate their own rhymes. Dr. Seuss books are always a favorite and children enjoy the silly words and colorful pages.

Sing! Songs are a great way to further rhyming abilities, as children can again predict what word might follow. Singing along in the car or at home can further children’s emergent love for words and reading and set them up for success at school.

Play! Children benefit from involved parents. Parents who take an interest in furthering learning and helping their children with literacy are likely to make the most gains. Apps and computers can be fun, but make sure to participate with children and reinforce stimulus presented electronically.

Talk with children about words, sounds, and sentences and make up rhymes together! Children may also enjoy picking the “odd man out,” or identifying a word that doesn’t rhyme from a group of rhyming words! Rhyming can be a great way to engage with children and promote early literacy skills.



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NSPT offers speech and language services in BucktownEvanstonHighland ParkLincolnwoodGlenview and Des Plaines. If you have questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140 and speak to one of our Family Child Advocates today!

prepping your child for kindegarten

On the Way…Prepping Your Child for Kindergarten

 

 

 

School is just around the corner, and some kiddos will be starting their journey into formal education as they head off to Kindergarten. Here are some tips to prepare your child…and yourself for this important milestone.

Why is it important to prepare your child for Kindergarten?

It is important that your child is prepared for this transition so they can have positive interactions when learning and participating in the classroom as well as to build their self-esteem and motivation.

What are common “readiness” skills?

While every school may have their own checklist or assessments, there are some basics skills that most Kindergarten teachers will look for including the following:

Self Help Skills

  • Child is able to be independent (eating, using restroom, clean up)
  • Able to ask for help, when appropriate
  • Can follow one-step and two-step directions

Social/Emotional Skills

  • Shares with others
  • Takes turns
  • Good listener
  • Able to work independently or in small groups
  • Plays/cooperates with others
  • Able to separate from Caregiver

Gross (large) Motor Skills

  • Runs, jumps
  • Able to bounce, kick, and throw a ball
  • Able to participate in small games
  • Can stand on one foot

Fine (small) Motor Skills

Math, Language, and Literacy Skills

  • Able to count to 10
  • Recognizes 10 or more letters, especially those in own name
  • Speaks in sentences of 5+ words
  • Speech is understandable to adults
  • Identifies and names basic shapes
  • Listens attentively and can respond to stories/books
  • Recognizes rhyming words and can put words together that rhyme

How can you help your child be ready for Kindergarten?

Here are some tips to help your child be the best they can be when heading off to Kindergarten:

  • Talk about what will happen in school—what will be the new routine?
  • Arrange a visit to the school and travel the route from home to school (especially if they will be on a bus).
  • Encourage play—independently and with other children.
  • Read, Read, Read—ask questions about the book (what may happen, what they learned), and have them identify colors, shapes, letters
  • Have child practice coloring, writing, and using scissors—“practice makes perfect!”
  • Talk with your child—ask them open-ended questions and have them reciprocate.
  • Use daily activities to point out words, numbers and help child formulate sentences of 5+ words.
  • Encourage independence in your child by having them do simple chores (ex: make bed, help set table/clean up at mealtimes, help with pets in household).

***Most importantly caregivers…be careful not to transmit any anxieties or sadness you may have when your “baby” goes off to school. Children can easily pick up on the emotions of adults, so wait until the bus is out of sight, or the car door closes and THEN pull out the tissues!!