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interpreting neuropsychological testing

A Guide To Understanding Neuropsychological Test Results

When a child comes in for a neuropsychological evaluation, it can provide an opportunity to gain a larger picture of how he learns and if support is needed in and outside of the classroom. The results from the evaluation can then help parents and teachers alike to better support the child’s learning. After a day of testing, there are a lot of numbers and verbiage that may seem overwhelming and difficult to understand… what does it all mean?! Here is a guide to understanding these sometimes complex neuropsychological test results.

Most psychological tests are reported with standard scores and percentiles. This number is representative of how the child scored in comparison to a representative sample of same-age peers. This group is the “norm” group.

Standard Scores

Standard Score: Based on scale with the average score of 100.interpreting neuropsychological tests

“Typical” limits of functioning:

  • Above Average: 110-119
  • Average is considered: 90-109
  • Low Average: 80-89

68% of the general population will perform within these limits

There are generally many small tests (subtests) that make up a larger area of functioning like Working Memory (aka short-term memory), for example. When the scores of all the subtests are combined you get a composite score, which is reported as a Standard Score. These composite scores tend to be a little more reliable than the individual scores on their own…

Why may you ask?  Attention, fine motor skills, alertness, distractibility, anxiety, etc.  can all play a role in a child’s performance.

All of these observations are taken into account when interpreting the child’s results.

 Percentiles

Percentiles: These often go hand in hand with the standard scores. If a child earned a standard score of 100, then they performed at the 50th percentile. If you took stats, this may ring a bell, if not, here’s another way to think about it..

-“Danny did as well or better than 50% of the his same-age peers”

Typical areas looked at during an evaluation:

Your child’s cognitive functioning =

  • Memory
  • Verbal Comprehension
  • Fluid Reasoning: ability to think logically & problem solve in new situations
  • Visual Spatial skills: ability to visualize things in your head
  • Processing Speed: how quickly a child can perform on an “easy” or over-learned activity

Your child’s academic functioning =

  • Reading
  • Writing
  • Math

If the child has attention, language, social or emotional concerns, different types of tests are administered to supplement the evaluation and is tailored to the parents’ concerns and child’s needs.


Neuropsychology testing IL
NSPT offers services in BucktownEvanstonHighland ParkLincolnwoodGlenview and Des Plaines. If you have questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140 and speak to one of our Family Child Advocates today!

What is Failure to Thrive and What Can Be Done About It? | Pediatric Therapy Tv

In today’s Webisode, a Registered Dietitian discusses Failure to Thrive and how you can help.

In this video you will learn:

  • The causes of Failure to Thrive
  • Steps and measures to take when your child shows signs of Failure to Thrive
  • How a dietitian and a doctor can help when your child has Failure to Thrive

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide
audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV where we provide experience and
innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn.

Robyn: Hello, and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I’m your host, Robyn
Ackerman. I’m standing here today with a registered dietician, Stephanie
Wells. Stephanie, can you tell us what failure to thrive is and what can be
done about it?

Stephanie: Sure. Failure to thrive is diagnosed in children that are less
than two years old when their weight for length is less than the fifth
percentile on the growth chart and for kids that are over two years old, if
their BMI is less than the fifth percentile on the growth chart.

So in terms of what can be done, first a doctor and a registered dietician
can assess if there are any medical factors that are causing the failure to
thrive and then address those medical issues if that’s necessary. Second,
then a dietician can meet with the parent and the child and put together a
high calorie, high protein diet that includes three meals and two to three
snacks per day. Third, often these children need to be on some sort of a
high calorie, high protein formula or oral supplement beverage which the
dietician can recommend and get a prescription for, if needed. And then
from there, the dietician and doctor will closely monitor the child’s
weight and growth to make sure that they’re moving in the right direction
and meeting the goals that the dietician has made for the child.

Robyn: All right. Thank you, Stephanie, for that explanation and thank you
to our viewers. And remember, keep on blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of mind
to your family with the best in educational programming. To subscribe to
our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit our website at
learnmore.me. That’s learnmore.me.