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child hates to read

Help! My Child Hates to Read

Reading homework and practice is a constant throughout a child’s educational career from the very beginning when a child is learning to read. Children need to practice reading for a variety of reasons, mainly to improve their own literacy skills, but also to be introduced to new vocabulary and concepts. Obviously, reading practice is important, but it is not always the easiest activity to complete in a child’s day, especially if he or she does not enjoy reading. Try these strategies to improving a child’s motivation to participate in reading activities.

Inspire your child to read with these tips:

  1. Let your child choose what he or she reads: If a child is not interested in reading a certainHelp! My Child Hates to Read book or story, it will only add to the negativity surrounding reading. Take your child to the library and give him or her the opportunity to explore various topics and pick something he or she is interested in. With added interest, comes increased motivation, which will ultimately lead to a more positive reading experience.
  1. EBooks: Try downloading a book on yours or the child’s iPad or computer. With the added flare of electronics, a child may be more motivated to complete his or her reading practice. Be sure to set boundaries with the child that no other activities or games should be completed on the iPad/computer during reading time.
  1. Family Reading Time: It can be difficult to get a child to separate him or herself from the rest of the family and afternoon activities to complete reading. Instead of having an individual expectation for one child, have the entire family sit down for their own respected reading time. This will help your child not feel so left out or discouraged when they are to complete their reading, instead it will be a family activity.
  1. Incentive Chart: Incentive charts work as a great motivational tool by giving the child something to work towards. Give your child a goal (e.g., 10 starts). You child can work towards that goal each time they complete their reading. Once the child earns the goal, they can then receive a motivating reward (e.g., getting a slurpee, a trip to the movie theater, etc.)
  1. Talk with your child: Have a discussion with your child about why he or she hates reading. It may be because it is hard for them. Be knowledgeable of the warning signs for a reading disorder, as your child may require additional support in this area. See the list of warning signs below and consult with your child’s teacher to get a better understanding for your child’s reading abilities:

Warning Signs of a Reading Disorder:

  • Dislike or avoidance of reading
  • Not understanding that words can be segmented (e.g., “cowboy” broken down is “cow” and “boy”).
  • Trouble with sound-letter relationships
  • Difficulty sounding out words
  • Difficulty understanding written and spoken language
  • Difficulty rhyming

Click here for more tips on how to get your child interested in reading.

NSPT offers services in BucktownEvanstonHighland ParkLincolnwoodGlenview and Des Plaines. If you have questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140 and speak to one of our Family Child Advocates today!

Learning to Read v. Reading to Learn

In elementary and middle schools, there tend to be two different stages of reading: learning to read, and reading to learn. These stages highlight the shift that children go through once they have learned to read, as they then use their reading to learn in all subject areas.

Learning to Read: For most children, this stage encompasses kindergarten through third grade. In these earlyThe Progression of Reading Skills elementary school years, children are learning the alphabetic principle, or the systematic and predictable relationship between sounds and letters. Children begin to understand how sounds make up syllables, syllables make up words, and words have meaning.

Reading to Learn: Once children reach fourth grade, the expectations change. Children are now expected to be proficient readers, and their learning is highly contingent upon reading abilities. Children become more independent with their education, and often homework assignments pertain to reading passages and answering questions or reading materials to study for tests and quizzes.

Potential Difficulties:

This system certainly has benefits. It builds upon previously learned skills and allows children to become more independent with their own learning. Once children are in the “reading to learn” phase, school work becomes more challenging, often targeting reading comprehension and more advanced writing activities. There are potential difficulties with this model, however. Once children reach fourth grade, many are still struggling with reading. As school work becomes more difficult, children stuck in the “learning to read” stage may fall behind in class, begin avoiding or disliking reading, and a larger gap than previously noticed may arise.

Warning signs of a Reading Disorder:

  • Dislike or avoidance of reading
  • Not understanding that words can be segmented
  • Trouble with sound-letter relationship
  • Difficulty sounding out words
  • Difficulty understanding written and spoken language
  • Difficulty rhyming

The later into schooling that children progress, the greater impact reading has on academic success, across all subjects. Math gets harder as story problems are introduced, science often has new concepts requiring children to read about, and even in English classes, children will no longer have spelling lists but will grades will suffer due to poor spelling. It is so important for parents and families to identify early struggles in reading and intervene!

NSPT offers our Blossom Reading Program in BucktownEvanstonHighland ParkLincolnwoodGlenview and Des Plaines. If you have questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140 and speak to one of our Family Child Advocates today!

 

Tips to Help Your Child with Word Retrieval

Parents may notice that their child may take longer to respond, may have difficulty picking the right word or may use filler words like “um” or “uh” more often than expected. All of these are signs of word finding difficulties, or trouble retrieving a desired word. These children are not having difficulties with vocabulary, they know the words, they simply can’t always access them in a desired moment. Difficulties with word finding or word retrieval is commonly associated with ADHD, reading disorders, and specific language disorders. If left untreated, word finding difficulties can impact a child’s success in school, notably in both oral and written communication.

So my child has word finding difficulties – now what?

A licensed speech-language pathologist can help! Direct therapy can target these difficulties and create strategies to help both at home and at school.  Parents can also work with their children at home by incorporating these tips into their everyday communications:

Wait: your child knows what he wants to say, he may just need a little more time. Allowing your child to work through these difficulties, retrieve the desired word, and participate in a conversation will help not only his self-esteem, but will also encourage strategy use.

Describe it: encourage your child to describe an object or experience if he is struggling. As adults, we all have all said, “It’s on the tip of my tongue” and have used this strategy. Support your child by having him describe the following:

  • Color (it can be brown)
  • Shape (it’s round)
  • Size (it fits in my hand)
  • Feel (soft or crunchy)
  • Parts (might have chocolate chips, raisins, or sprinkles)
  • Where we find it (at the grocery store)
  • Who uses it (we all do)
  • When do we use it (after dinner)
  • What do we do with it (eat it)

These strategies can be helpful for children who are not having word finding difficulties, too! Describing things will encourage language development and growth and will allow children to expand their repertoire!



Signs of Reading Disability Across Grades

Reading Disability (also known as “Dyslexia”) is a disorder of phonology at its base.  It affects reading, writing, and sometimes other skills such as memorization of math facts and language expression.  We know that Reading Disability is persistent but also highly responsive to the right interventions.  Taken in part from the book Overcoming Dyslexia, written by Sally Shaywitz, M.D., I have put together the following list of common signs across grade levels that a child may be struggling with reading.  The presence of one, or even many of these clues, does not by itself warrant alarm of a problem.  However, if you suspect your child is struggling with reading, please seek an evaluation to determine the nature of the difficulties and to make sure that your child is given a fair chance in reading. Read more

3 Signs Your Child May Have Dyslexia | Pediatric Therapy Tv

In today’s Webisode, an Academic Specialist explains ways to determine if your child has dyslexia.

Click here to learn more about dyslexia and find out more signs and characteristics to look for.

In this video you will learn:

  • What is dyslexia
  • How do children develop dyslexia
  • What are common signs in children with dyslexia

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide
audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV where we provide experience and
innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn.

Robyn: Hello, and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I’m your host Robyn
Ackerman. I’m sitting here today with Elizabeth Galin [SP], an academic
specialist. Elizabeth, can you tell us three signs to look out for that a
child may suffer from dyslexia?

Elizabeth: Absolutely. And to start, dyslexia is a learning disability
characterized by an inability to decode words. So kids who have dyslexia
show trouble with spelling, with reading fluently, reading with accuracy.
It’s a deficit in the phonological component of language. So the first
thing that is a sign that your child may have dyslexia is a lack of
interest in reading. Most young children really enjoy reading and look
forward to that time but dyslexic kids, it’s difficult so they might run
away and hide. They’re not interested. Second is a lack of understanding
that letters make a sound, the phonological component again. So each letter
has an associated sound and that’s a really difficult association for
dyslexic kids to make. And lastly, dyslexic kids, when they begin to read
once they get a little bit older, they often make reading errors that
really just don’t even connect to the word at all. It’s different sounds.
Dyslexic kids often have a hard time sounding out words, and they have a
hard time with even the most basic of sight words. So if you’re seeing any
of those in your child, it might be worth a look.

Robyn: All right. Thank you so much, Elizabeth, and thank you to our
viewers and remember, keep on blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of mind
to your family with the best in educational programming. To subscribe to
our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit our website at
learnmore.me. That’s learnmore.me.

A Checklist for Language Based Reading Difficulties

Learning to read is such a monumental milestone for children in early elementary school, but it can also be a source of stress for concerned parents or for children who don’t seem to “pick it up” as easily as others. Since reading is a fundamental skill which only increases in importance as students move on to later grades in school, early identification of at-risk readers is key to ensuring academic success for all children.

Listed below is a checklist which can be used to identify children (in kindergarten – first grade) who may benefit from further evaluation by a speech-language pathologist:

Speech sound awareness:Child with reading difficulties

  • Does not understand or enjoy rhymes (may have difficulty clapping hands/tapping feet in rhythm to songs or rhymes)
  • Does not recognize words with the same beginning sound
  • Has difficulty counting syllables in spoken words
  • Difficulty learning sound-letter correspondences ( the letter ‘b’ says ‘buh’)

Written language awareness:

  • Does not orient book properly while looking through books
  • Cannot identify words and letters in picture books

Letter name knowledge:

  • Cannot recite the alphabet
  • Cannot identify printed letters as they are named or name letters when asked.

Word retrieval:

  • Has difficulty finding a specific word in conversation, uses non-specific words (thing, stuff) or substitutes a related term
  • Poor memory for classmates names
  • Halting speech- pauses and filler words used (“um” or “you know”)

Speech production/perception:

  • Difficulty saying common words with difficult sound patterns (i.e. cinnamon, specific, library)
  • Mishears and then mispronounces words/names
  • Frequent slips of the tongue (says “brue blush” for “blue brush”)

Comprehension:

  • Only responds to part of a multi-step direction or instruction or requests multiple repetitions for instructions
  • Difficulty understanding spatial terms (in front, behind etc.)
  • Difficulty understanding stories

Expressive language:

  • Uses short sentences with a small vocabulary, little variety
  • Difficulty giving directions or explanations, little detail provided
  • Disorganized story-telling or event recall
  • Grammar errors (“he goed to the store”)

Literacy motivation:

  • Does not enjoy classroom story-time (wanders, does not pay attention when teacher reads stories)
  • Shows little interest in literacy activities (looking at books, writing)

If your child or a child you work with can be described by many of the items on this checklist, further evaluation of their language skills is warranted to ensure appropriate intervention is provided and continued literacy learning is encouraged. There are many professionals (teachers, reading specialists, and speech-language pathologists) who are trained to assist children in acquiring early literacy skills or supporting children who exhibit difficulty in this area. However, areas of expertise vary and depending on the needs of your child, the appropriate professional to help can be identified.

This checklist is modified from H. Catts’s 2002 publication in Languge, speech, and Hearing Services in Schools as presented in Rhea Paul’s Language Disorders from Infancy through Adolescence.

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10 Signs of a Reading Disorder

Many people believe that reading is a natural process that comes easily to children, especially in homes that value literacy.  This assumption can be frustrating and heartbreaking to a parent of a child with dyslexia or reading comprehension problems. Approximately 1 in 5 children have dyslexia, which is defined as trouble recognizing and decoding words, most likely due to a deficit in the phonological component of language.  Here are several things to look for in developing readers that may signal dyslexia or a reading comprehension problem:

10 signs that your child may have a reading disorder: Little girl picking behind a book

  1. An intense dislike and avoidance of reading time
  2. A lack of understanding that words can be broken down into smaller parts
  3. Difficulty associating letters with sounds
  4. Inability to sound out simple words
  5. Imprecise language
  6. A family history of reading problems
  7. Reading errors that are not connected to the sounds of the letters in the words
  8. Difficulty finding the right word or coming up with a verbal response
  9. Mispronunciation of long words
  10. Lack of fluent speech

Dyslexic children are bright and talented in many ways, and there is help for dyslexic readers.  The Orton-Gillingham method is a systematic, multi-sensory approach that helps dyslexic children break the reading code and succeed.  If you worry that your child may have a reading comprehension problem, schedule a consultation with one of our Orton-Gillingham trained academic specialists.

For more information on Dyslexia Treatment, please click here.

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