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Sit Back, Relax, and Enjoy Your Very Own Body Pillow

Throughout the clinic, the options are endless as far as games to play, equipment to climb, and toys to use. With all the available choices, onebody pillow item continues to be a favorite of children of all ages and interests: the body pillow. For all of you craft-loving parents, as well as those (like me) who are “creatively challenged,” here are DIY instructions for creating your very own, personalized body pillow.

Step 1: Cut a large foam block into tons of little pieces varying in shape and size. Most pieces should be about four inches in diameter. Set these pieces aside for later.

Step 2: Next, choose a simple twin-sized duvet cover. Fill this cover with the foam pieces as full as you see fit. This will create the body of the pillow. Some kids prefer the pillows to be overflowing with foam pieces so that they can sit high up on top, while others prefer to sink into the crevices of a pillow that is less full. Once the foam is in the cover, secure it tightly by using the buttons and by tying the ends into knots.

Step 3: Once the body of the pillow is filled to your child’s preference and tightly secured, slip it into a second duvet cover. This is where you can add a personal touch by choosing a fabric that is your child’s favorite color, has her favorite movie character, or matches the interior decoration scheme in her room. Once again, make sure this casing is secured tightly to prevent the foam from escaping. A second cover also gives you the opportunity to wash the outermost layer of your new pillow without emptying the foam.

Step 4: Kick back and relax on your very own personalized body pillow.

Here at NSPT, we use the encapsulating body pillows for an endless amount of activities. At home, you can use the new comfort havens in a quiet place where your child can go to be by herself, calm down after an argument, or read a book.  She may feel a sense of comfort and ownership if she has a safe place that is designated as her own. The pillow can also be used for various activities that can provide your child with deep proprioceptive input to help her self-regulate. In the clinic, for example, we frequently use the pillow to help us create “Kiddo Sandwiches.” In this activity, the children lay on a soft surface under the pillow while their therapist “squishes” their bodies with quick and rhythmic pushes on the pillow. Kids really get into this activity and frequently tell their therapist what ingredient should be squished into their body sandwich next (e.g., cheese, turkey, or mustard).

Whether you use the pillow as a place to lounge, a self-regulation tool, or just a cool piece of furniture, it is sure to become a family favorite in no time. This is a great craft to save for a rainy day and a great one to get the whole family involved.

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How to Cope with Night Terrors

Night terrors are a sleep problem that is most common in children ages 2-6 (but can occur at almost any age). They occur occasionally in about 15% of young children and can last 5-30 minutes. You may see your child bolted upright in bed, crying or screaming, sometimes appearing to be awake but with no recognition of who you are. Night terrors differ from nightmares in that your child is not likely to remember anything in the morning.child with a night terror

Because night terrors are considered normal, you do not need to seek treatment (as long as you have ruled out any underlying medical or mental health conditions). However, they are often very scary and distressing for both the children and their parents. What you can do, is identify ways to help your child cope with the stress and promote a calming sleep environment. Children who are overtired, experiencing stressful life events, or have a fever may be more likely to have night terrors.

If you catch your child in the middle of a night terror, it is suggested that you do not try to wake them out of it. This could scare them—especially because of your own stressed reaction. It is usually best to make sure they are safe (gently restrain if needed) and wait until it is over. You can provide comfort, speak softly and calmly, and help them return to sleep (in their own bed).

Steps You Can Take to Ease the Stress of Night Terrors:

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