HOW TO ENCOURAGE YOUR CHILD TO DO HOMEWORK | Pediatric Therapy Tv

In today’s Webisode, a Pediatric Behavior Analyst explains techniques on how to encourage your child to do homework. She will cover various approaches to help the parent understand the child’s behavior and assist him to want to do homework as a result.

In this video you will learn:

  • What goals can a parent set to help the child do homework
  • The significance of adaptive behavior with the approach to homework
  • Ways to help your child want to do homework

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide
audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and
innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn.Robyn: Hello and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I’m your host, Robyn
Ackerman. Today I’m standing with Behavior Analyst Katie
Sadowski.

Katie, can you give us some pointers on how to encourage a child
to do homework?

Katie: Yes. To help your child get more involved with their homework,
some things that you can do are create a schedule in which
there’s an exact day and time that your child will do the
homework. Looking at weekdays, they can do their homework right
when they get home from school or maybe they want to do it after
dinner.

Another thing is the weekends. It is usually best to have your
child do homework on Friday so they’re not rushing on Sunday
night trying to get it done. With this schedule of the time, you
definitely want to have your child involved. Have them pick out
the time and just be creative with that. With that being done,
you do want to stick to having that schedule and always do
homework at that time.

Even with a schedule, there might be situations where your child
will want to do something else. He might want to go play
basketball or play Wii. In those situations you want to use
‘first/then’ directives. You’re still going to stick to that
schedule. You’re going to tell your child, “First you can do
your homework, and then you can go play basketball.”

Another thing that can be helpful is having a designated area to
do homework. To do that, pick an area in the house. You want to
find somewhere where there aren’t a lot of distractions, maybe
in the kitchen doing it at the table or at the computer or
office studio. Those would be great choices. Even going to the
library and having his homework be done there. With your
designated area, you do want to go ahead and have all the
utensils that the child would need; pencils, paper, markers,
whatever they would need, so they’re not wasting time and
prolonging the homework process.

Another thing that can be done is providing praise for your
child and giving them encouragement, “Great job doing your
work,” and, “I like how you’re being so studious.” With more
challenging things, you can do things in regards to giving them
tangible reinforcement. Maybe they had a really big task or a
really big project that they spent a lot of time on and were
nervous about. You can do an extra little, “Let’s go get some
ice cream,” or, “You got an A on that test. I’m so happy. I know
you wanted this toy,” just a little more reinforcement. You
don’t always want to give that reinforcement because you want
them to be doing their homework on their own, but that’s just
helpful for harder subjects or things that they might struggle
with.

Another thing is that when your child is doing homework, you
should also be quiet. You don’t want to be doing things that are
going to be fun and exciting that your child would want to do.
Try to avoid playing on the computer, doing Wii Fit, and things
of that nature. At that time you can be paying your bills or
responding to emails, something that’s just a little more low-
key and your child won’t want to be involved with.

Robyn: All right. Thank you so much. Those are actually really
wonderful tips. Thank you to our viewers, and remember, keep on
blossoming.

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