How Do I Know if My Child Has a Reading Disability?

Reading Disabilities are estimated to occur at a prevalence rate of 5-10%.  A disability, which is a more chronic struggle with reading without early identification and intervention, must be differentiated from the child who demonstrates a slower process in the normal developmental curve of reading development.  A disability will not resolve with repeated practice, extra attention, or the passage of time.  Below are a few clues to help figure out if there really is a disability.

Clues that Indicate Your Child May Have a Reading Disability:

  • Your child has difficulty with basic rhyming.
  • Your child has always been slow to learn the alphabet and maybe even numbers.
  • Your child struggles with sound-letter associations.
  •  Your child’s writing is illegible.
  • Your child likes to be read to but never wants to read.
  • Sight words, despite repeated practice, are easily forgotten by your child.

At times, differentiating between a disability and other factors (e.g., attention, motivation and interest, or behavior) can make accurate identification difficult.  An evaluation can help tease apart any related factors that may be impacting your child’s success.  If you are concerned with your child’s reading development, you can request an evaluation through our Neuropsychology Diagnostic Clinic.  We have clinicians trained in the diagnosis and assessment of reading disabilities and are able to provide efficacious recommendations to best help your child.
Click here to read about signs of a reading disability across grades.


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