set up a routine for homework success

Set-Up a Routine for Homework Happiness

 

 

 

Children with attentional problems or issues with executive functioning often have difficulties with homework completion. Several issues associated with executive functioning lead to concerns with the ability to complete daily work including the following:

  • Initiation on work
  • Organization concerns
  • Time management
  • Difficulty transitioning

When is the best time for my child to do homework?

Oftentimes children will want to have a break from school work when they come home. They want to play for a while before doing work. I would actually recommend that the child immediately start homework when he gets home. Research has indicated that children with attentional problems and poor executive functioning have difficulty transitioning between tasks. The child is still in the school mindset when he arrives home. Having the child take a break and then later transition back to homework likely will prove difficult. Instead, I would recommend that the child have a light snack and then immediately start the work.

How should I structure the homework space?

Organization, or lack thereof, is a hallmark feature of poor executive functioning. With that in mind, I would highly recommend that the homework environment in which the child is working be as organized and structured as possible. Have a specific desk or table where work is to be done. Keep the table as clean as possible with a minimal amount of distractions in the room. Oftentimes, having the child complete homework in his room proves to be a disaster. There are too many distractions that keep the child’s interest away from the homework assignment. It may prove best to select a quiet room away from family members with the fewest distractions possible.  Click here to watch a Pediatric TV Episode on setting up a homework station.

How do I work on time management with my child?

Parents often state that the child has no idea about time management or how long tasks should last. I often recommend that parents have the child provide an estimate of how long he perceives a task should last. Time the child and then provide the difference as to how long he thought the work would last and how long it actually lasted. Then the next day, have the child again provide an estimate as to how long the task will last. If the child is way off with the estimate, pull out the data from the night before and ask if he wants to revise his estimate. Keep this going until the child starts to develop an actual idea of how long tasks should last.

These are just a few tips to keep homework as structured as possible. Help the child start homework right away as it will help with initiation on tasks as well as ensuring a smooth transition between demands. Keep the room and desk as organized as possible to limit distractions and off-task behaviors. Provide some guidance with time management by helping identify how long tasks and assignments should last.

Read here for 8 more tips to ease homework time stress!







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